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MDE OFFICIAL COMMUNICATION

Week of April 19, 2010

#050-10 - Accounting and Auditing Alert
The Michigan Department of Education is pleased to provide you with the 2009-2010 Accounting & Auditing Alert.  It is available on our web site at: www.michigan.gov/mdeaudit.  The alert has been reviewed by a referent group of certified public accountants and school district personnel.  The Michigan School Auditing Manual has not been updated because of time constraints caused by the 2009 furlough days. Please continue to use the 2008-2009 auditing manual. http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Accounting_and_Auditing_Alert_Memo_4-22-10_318771_7.pdf 

#051-10 – Annual Education Reports required under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act
Most Michigan districts, schools and public school academies (PSAs) have had difficulty meeting the complex annual reporting requirements of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 2001 (ESEA), formerly known as the No Child Left Behind Act.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/OFS_OEAA_Annual_Ed_Report_04-22-10_318772_7.pdf

#052-10 - Career Planning Information
Students need help in planning for a career.  Not only knowing the courses they need that will help them, but also what careers align with their unique strengths, talents, interests, aspirations, and values. We have a vision that all students will achieve challenging academic and technical standards and be prepared for high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand occupations in current or emerging professions in the 21stcentury global economy.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/OCTE_Career_Planning_Info_04-22-10_318775_7.pdf  


April 20, 2010

Subject: Using Student Data to Help Educators

Phi Delta Kappan, the monthly magazine for the international professional association in education Phi Delta Kappa, published an insightful article by Dr. Joseph Martineau, Director of the Office of Assessment and Accountability for the Michigan Department of Education.

In his article, Dr. Martineau uses an ingenious allegory to help illustrate the use of student data in educator evaluations.

In compliance with the recently-enacted state school reform law to use student achievement data for educator evaluations, the Michigan Department of Education is committed to making that system fair for teachers and administrators – using the first four years of data for the purpose of intense professional development.

Please take a few minutes to read Dr. Martineau’s article and pass it on to all of the teachers, administrators, and school board members you know. Knowledge and understanding are the keys to growth and collaboration in education.

Respectfully,

Martin Ackley, Director
Office of Communications
Michigan Department of Education

File Name and Bibliographic Information:
k1004ma2.pdf
Joseph A. Martineau, The Validity of Value-Added Models: An Allegory,
Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 91, No. 7, April 2010, pp. 64-67.

For further information, contact:
Phi Delta Kappa International, Inc.
408 N. Union St.
Bloomington, Indiana 47405-3800
812/339-1156 Phone
800/766-1156 Tollfree
812/339-0018 Fax
http://www.pdkintl.org


posted here April 20,2010

More Oversight Recommended for Emergency Financial Managers for Schools

April 19, 2010

LANSING – The State Board of Education last week called for greater oversight of Emergency Financial Managers for school districts. The Board unanimously passed a motion to support improvements to Public Act 72 to ensure accountability and transparency of an Emergency Financial Manager (EFM).

Current law gives no authority or role to the State Board or state Superintendent of Public Instruction of day-to-day operations, decisions, review of contracts or contracting practices and decisions of an Emergency Financial Manager or his/her staff. According to the law, the role of the State Superintendent is to ensure that the Emergency Financial Manager works to eliminate the financial emergency at that school district.

“More needs to be done to make sure that Emergency Financial Managers are doing what is right for our school districts and our school children,” said State Board of Education President Kathleen N. Straus.

The current provisions of P.A. 72 limit the role of the state Superintendent to declaring a Financial Emergency of a school district; recommending names to the Governor for appointment of an Emergency Financial Manager; and authority to allow the Emergency Financial Manager to hire a few staff members to assist the EFM in addressing the financial emergency.

“This has nothing to do with any current court case and goes beyond the current situation at Detroit Public Schools,” said state Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan.

“Financial emergencies may need to be declared in other school districts across Michigan, as they continue to struggle to make the necessary reforms to bring their finances into balance.”

P.A. 72 addresses financial emergencies and Emergency Financial Managers for both local municipalities and school districts. On the municipal side of P.A. 72, there is an oversight board that is designed to review and monitor the work of the Emergency Financial Manager of those municipalities. There is no such independent oversight board on the school side of P.A. 72.

It is being recommended that if and when the state Legislature revises P.A. 72, the law be amended to include an oversight board for an Emergency Financial Manager of a school district.

Discussions on this point included that to prevent any suggestion of conflict of interest and provide the proper measure of checks and balances, any such oversight board should not include the Governor, who appoints an Emergency Financial Manager, or the Superintendent of Public Instruction, who declares the financial emergency.


STATE BOARD PRESENTS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR EDUCATION INVESTMENT AND REFORM

April 14, 2010 LANSING – State Board of Education members agreed Tuesday on what public education funding should look like in Michigan and are seeking comment over the next month on the draft recommendations, as well as on the specific mix of cuts and revenues that would pay for that system.

Board members unanimously agreed that school funding must be equitable, durable, grow with Michigan’s economy, and must provide services from early childhood programs through higher education.

The State Board unanimously voted to support the direction of its preliminary plan Recommendations to Better Support Michigan’s Education System – Revenues, Reforms and Restructuring, which contains a variety of education restructuring, reforms and revenues.

"This is a way to rebuild the state," said State Board President Kathleen N. Straus. "It’s absolutely essential for Michigan to grow. There have to be reforms, but everyone said we need a combination of reform, more efficient ways to deliver services, and additional revenues."

The Board will continue to refine the specific recommendations by inviting comment and input from the Governor, state Legislature, education community, candidates for office, and other interested parties until the May 11 meeting of the State Board.

"We need to set the table for this," said State Board Vice President John C. Austin, who spearheaded the development of the preliminary plan. "We have to have a discussion in a non-partisan way. We hope we can see some action on this, this year."

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan said the State Board’s preliminary plan is "the single best effort done in years to try to find long- and short-term solutions."

Austin sees the State Board’s preliminary plan as an approach that is broader than other strategies that have been proposed.

"We're just nicking around at this in the Legislature," he said, "and not at the scale we need to have the kind of education the people in the state must have to compete. So we're recommending a balanced, comprehensive, long-term approach."

The State Board’s guiding principles to restructuring Michigan’s education system ensure that any changes be:

Equitable: The education program should be the same across the state (it should not matter where you go to school [big or small; rich or poor]). Resources appropriate to deliver comparable quality education for all students need be provided.

Predictable and Durable: Funding for the whole education system needs to be predictable and sustainable, and, at a minimum keep up with the Michigan economy.

Holistic: Michigan’s education system needs to include support of a continuum of learning: early childhood education; K-12 education, and higher education if Michigan citizens are to succeed, and our economy improve.

Shared Sacrifice: Given Michigan’s long-term financial challenges, need to cut costs, and focus resources where they are needed to support learning, there must be shared sacrifice in operating education more efficiently.

21st Century: Need to bring education service delivery into the 21st Century – in its structure, organization, expectations, schedule, and mode of operations.

Balanced Approach: A combination of reforms, cuts, and targeted investment are needed to restructure Michigan’s system for effectiveness. The problems cannot be solved by cuts, nor more money alone. The State Board of Education recognizes we have to have reform, do more with less, and do it differently.

"Our state is at a crossroads and we have to decide what kind of state we want," said State Board member Casandra Ulbrich. "It’s about job creation and education. We can’t afford not to do it."

State Board member Nancy Danhof said that an education funding solution has to consider an examination of the larger budget priority picture.

"We need to make the really tough decisions on rearranging what we do have before we can look at new revenues," she said. "Put everything on the table, rearrange, then see what we need in terms of revenue. We can’t go back to where we once were by tinkering. We have to be bold in what we do."

State Board member Reginald Turner acknowledged the balanced approach to the preliminary plan. "There has to be shared sacrifice," Turner said. "When we ask citizens for more revenues, we have to show that the system is as efficient and effective as possible."

Turner suggested that the preliminary plan be provided to candidates for Governor "who will be leading our state. We will want to know where they stand and start to elevate the debate."

To review and comment on the Recommendations to Better Support Michigan’s Education System – Revenues, Reforms and Restructuring, go to www.michigan.gov/sbe.


STATE BOARD COMMENDS STATE SUPERINTENDENT; EXTENDS HIS CONTRACT BY ANOTHER YEAR

April 14, 2010

LANSING – The State Board of Education on Tuesday extended by one year the contract of state Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan, through May 1, 2013, while acknowledging the fine work he and the staff of the Michigan Department of Education are doing to lead reforms in Michigan’s education system.

"There is consensus among the Board that Mike is doing an excellent job," said State Board Vice President John C. Austin.

Upon Flanagan’s request, the State Board also agreed to allow him to take any adjustments to his compensation that reflects those taken by other state employees.

"We would like to give him a raise," Austin said, "but appreciate Mike’s offer and understanding of the budget issues Michigan has. We appreciate his leadership."


Friday April 9, 2010

Free Pre-Conference: 2010 Charter School Facilities Institute

FROM: Greg Olszta (forwarded from Dean Kern, USDoE)

FREE PRE-CONFERENCE EVENT, JUNE 28th
2010 Charter School Facilities Institute
Register Today-FREE
http://www2.learningpt.org/NCSRCFacilitiesInstitute/register.aspx

June 28, 2010

Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile
540 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL

Are you searching for a school building that will make the educational vision of your charter come to life? Is your school currently housed in a space that doesn’t meet your needs? Are you overwhelmed by the process of constructing a new school?  Not sure how to access financing?

Come join us for the U.S. Department of Education’s 2010Charter School Facilities InstituteThis free, full-day event is in partnership with the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools and is being by conducted the National Charter School Resource Center at Learning Point Associates.  This pre-conference session will complement the facilities strand at the 2010 National Charter Schools Conference, which will begin on June 29, 2010. 

Learn from charter school leaders and national experts about the facilities planning process and financing as you engage in interactive conference sessions. Each session will provide meaningful step-by-step assistance in one phase of the planning process. Featured topics include:

  • Conceptualizing your school facility needs
  • Predevelopment planning: Creating high quality spaces
  • Finding short-term leased space
  • Construction planning and management
  • Politics and fundraising
  • Indicators for quality loans

For questions or additional information, please contact Peggie Garcia by telephone (312-288-7642) or e-mail (peggie.garcia@learningpt.org). 

________________________________________________________

And Don’t Forget to Register Today for the 10th National Charter Schools Conference!
www.nationalcharterconference.org

June 28 - July 1, 2010 in Chicago, Illinois

We hope you will join us at the 10th National Charter Schools Conference which will be held June 28 - July 1, 2010 in Chicago, Illinois.  Each year, the conference provides the sole opportunity for the entire movement to gather – leaders, teachers, and board members of charter schools; authorizers and legislators; and supporters in business and philanthropy.

The 2010 theme is "Innovators in Education: Leading the Race to the Top" -- chosen because the charter school sector is truly at the cutting edge of education reform. Now serving more than 1.5 million students in 4,900 schools, public charter schools provide outstanding examples of innovation and quality.  The conference will be divided into eleven strands including Law and Policy; Finance; the role of Charter Support Organizations; Quality Innovation, Student Achievement; and Governance.


April 5, 2010

MDE Official Communication

Memo #046-10 - Special Education Public Reporting of District Data
Guidelines regarding the federal regulations implementing the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) at §300.602(b)(1)(i)(A) requirement of public reporting on the performance of each local education agency on the targets established in the State Performance Plan (SPP) for each of the priority areas.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/OSE-EIS_ECEFS_Public_Reporting_317253_7.pdf


March 30, 2010

MDE Press Release

Library of Michigan's 2010 Michigan Notable Books Reflect Our State’s Legacy of Perseverance

December 10, 2009

LANSING - The Library of Michigan today announced the list of the 2010 Michigan Notable Books – 20 books highlighting Michigan people, places, and events. “This year’s selections prove that persevering through economic and personal hardship is nothing new for Michiganians, and that this enduring and independent spirit has a long, rich history in the Great Lakes State,” said state Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan.

Short stories of despairing people moving toward salvation; a biography of the state’s first geologist, who discovered many of Michigan’s natural treasures; and a children’s book that tells the story of a slave family’s flight to freedom are among this year’s most notable Michigan books.

“This year’s Michigan Notable Books bring to life the Michigan experience through vivid storytelling that creates portraits of the people and places that make Michigan great,” said State Librarian Nancy Robertson. “Addressing Michigan’s natural beauty, its innovative leaders or the faith of its people, these books celebrate Michigan as a place and a people that even in the most trying of times find transformation. The Library of Michigan is delighted to honor these 20 books as the 2010 Michigan Notable Books.”

Each year the Michigan Notable Books (MNB) list features 20 books published in the previous calendar year that are about, or set in, Michigan or the Great Lakes region, or are written by a Michigan author. Selections include nonfiction and fiction books that appeal to a variety of audiences and cover a range of topics and issues close to the hearts of Michigan residents.

Michigan Notable Books is a statewide program that began as part of the 1991 Michigan Week celebration, geared to pay tribute and draw attention to the many people, places and things that make Michigan life unique. In that regard, MNB successfully highlights Michigan books and writers focusing on the Great Lakes State. Each title on the 2010 list gives readers insight into what it means to make your home in Michigan and proves some of the greatest stories are indeed found in the Great Lakes region.

This year's Michigan Notable Book selection committee includes representatives from the Library of Michigan; Borders Inc.; Cooley Law School; The Detroit News; Detroit Public Library; Grand Valley State University; Lansing City Pulse; Michigan Center for the Book; Michigan Historical Center; Schuler Books & Music; and the Traverse City Record Eagle.

The Library of Michigan museum store will carry the 2010 Michigan Notable Books and the books will also be available at the Michigan e-store at http://apps.michigan.gov/MichiganeStore/public/Home.aspx.

For more information about the MNB program, call 517 373-1300, visit www.michigan.gov/notablebooks or e-mail michigannotablebooks@michigan.gov.

The 2009 Michigan Notable Books are:

American Salvage: Stories by Bonnie Jo Campbell. Wayne State University Press. In these stories about cold, lonely, working-class Michigan life, Campbell creates a world where salvation counterbalances loss and despair, and she leaves the reader with a sense of hope and belief things will get better. Campbell’s daring stories and exceptional writing create an image of rural Michigan that lingers and cannot be forgotten.

Annie’s Ghosts: A Journey into a Family’s Secret by Steve Luxenberg. Hyperion. The fear of mental illness hits deep into the psyche, and that terror brings about this fascinating book of research into family genealogy, personal history and secrets long held. It all started when Detroit native Steve Luxenberg began to discover some discrepancies in his mother's stories about her family as she neared the end of her life. A complex blend of genealogy research, cultural mores and a long-past Detroit are brought alive. Despite the secrets, Luxenberg’s love of his family is clear, and while not all is discovered, much is, and his story becomes a story that belongs to all of us.

The Art Student’s War: A Novel by Brad Leithauser. Alfred A. Knopf. The vividly depicted city of Detroit takes a lead role in this historical coming-of-age novel set in World War II. A talented art student, Bianca Paradiso volunteers to draw portraits of wounded soldiers at the local hospital. As turmoil engulfs her Italian family, Bianca struggles in both her relationship with one of her sketch subjects and her budding romance with the son of a local drug store titan.

Bath Massacre: America’s First School Bombing by Arnie Bernstein. University of Michigan Press. On May 18, 1927, an explosion rocked the small town of Bath, in Clinton County, when dynamite planted by Andrew Kehoe detonated in the basement of the local school. In this dramatic history of the horrific tragedy that claimed more than 40 lives (most of them schoolchildren), including Kehoe and his wife, the author skillfully explores the origins and events leading up to the tragedy, the terrible destruction at the school and Kehoe’s farm, and how the stunned community struggled to cope in the immediate aftermath.

Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City by Greg Grandin. Metropolitan Books/Henry Holt. The remarkable story of Henry Ford’s failed attempt to transform the rugged Brazilian Amazon rainforest into both a factory and a model American-style town, complete with golf courses and ice cream shops. Fordlandia represents a fascinating dichotomy matching the Amazon rainforest, with its complex natural environment and rugged conditions, against the automobile industrialist who had perfected the assembly line.

Have a Little Faith: A True Story of a Last Request by Mitch Albom. Hyperion. Mitch Albom offers a story about his eight-year journey between two worlds, two men and two faiths. After Albom’s hometown rabbi asked him to deliver his eulogy, Albom tried to learn more about the man and found himself thrown back to a world of faith he’d left years ago. By examining his faith, Albom also connected with a Detroit pastor, a former convict preaching to the poor and homeless in a decaying church with a hole in its roof. Ten percent of the profits from this book will go to charity, including The Hole in the Roof Foundation, which helps refurbish places of worship that aid the homeless.

Isadore’s Secret: Sin, Murder and Confession in a Northern Michigan Town by Mardi Link. University of Michigan Press. An astonishing story of a nun who was murdered in Isadore nearly 100 years ago. Years after the nun’s disappearance, her bones were found, but only when local law enforcement found out about this murder as gossip spread through the town was anything done to find out who killed the nun, Sister Janina. A compelling story and a well-researched and carefully written account of the events that affected Isadore and its Catholic Polish population so greatly.

January’s Sparrow by Patricia Polacco. Philomel. In January 1874 in Marshall, slave takers came to take the Crosswhites back to Kentucky. This is the story of how the Crosswhites came to Marshall, why they stayed there and what happened on that day the whole town rose up to save the  Crosswhites from the slave takers. This is Polacco’s second time on the Michigan Notable Books list (An Orange for Frankie).

The Lost Tiki Palaces of Detroit: Stories by Michael Zadoorian. Wayne State University Press. Interesting and quirky characters abound in this engaging collection of short stories set in and around Detroit. Divided in sections appropriately named West Side, East Side and Downtown, the collection portrays common themes relevant to the region and the city, including hardship, racial tension and hope.

Michigan’s Columbus: The Life of Douglass Houghton by Steve Lehto. Momentum Books. This well-researched and readable biography details the extraordinary – and tragically short – life of one of the most important figures in Michigan history. Having earlier accompanied Henry Rowe Schoolcraft on his expeditions through the Lake Superior region and the upper Mississippi valley, Houghton was the state’s first geologist, from 1837 until his death at age 36 in 1845. His 1841 annual report detailed the rich copper deposits found in the Keweenaw Peninsula, and, by suggesting they could be mined successfully and profitably, helped foster Michigan’s subsequent mining boom. This is Lehto’s second time on the Michigan Notable Books list (Death’s Door: The Truth Behind Michigan’s Largest Mass Murder).

Nothing But a Smile: A Novel by Steve Amick. Pantheon Books. Steve Amick gives the reader a remarkable portrait of postwar America. When Wink Dutton is discharged from the army in 1944, he has little to his name besides his Purple Heart. His prospects change unexpectedly, however, when he meets the beautiful Sal Chesterton. The story plays out against wartime struggles, the Chicago underworld of the 1940s and 1950s, HUAC and the Red Scare and the postwar migration of Americans from the cities to the suburbs. This is Amick’s second time on the Michigan Notable Books list (The Lake, The River & the Other Lake).

Orlando M. Poe: Civil War General and Great Lakes Engineer by Paul Taylor. Kent State University Press. A comprehensive biography of General Sherman’s right-hand man, Orlando M. Poe, who served in the Civil War, commanded the 2nd Michigan Infantry and led brigades at Second Bull Run and Fredericksburg. This influential man was much praised for his bravery and service. He went on to lead an illustrious career as the supervisor for the design and construction of numerous Great Lakes lighthouses and then designed and constructed the largest shipping lock in the world at Sault Ste. Marie.

Our People, Our Journey: The Little River Band of Ottawa Indians by James M. McClurken. Michigan State University Press. Utilizing compelling photographs of the families that constitute it, this important and well-researched history of the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians traces the tribe’s migration into Michigan’s Grand River Valley, its later settlement on reservations in Mason, Muskegon and Oceana counties, the difficult relationship between the tribe and the U.S. government and successful efforts to maintain the tribe’s unique cultural identity through the present day.

Pandora’s Locks: The Opening of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway by Jeff Alexander. Michigan State University Press. A powerfully and thoughtfully written story of the impact the opening of the Great Lakes has had on the environment, water conditions and quality of life in the Great Lakes states. The high cost of tolerating dumping deep-sea ballast and exotic species into the lakes is carefully detailed and the personal cost is well displayed. This is a wellresearched book that indeed gives one hope among the ruins. This is Alexander’s second time on the Michigan Notable Books list (The Muskegon: The Majesty and Tragedy of Michigan’s Rarest River).

Roses and Revolutions: The Selected Writings of Dudley Randall edited by Melba Joyce Boyd. Wayne State University Press. This beautifully edited anthology pulls together Dudley Randall’s major works in one volume. Long-time Detroit resident Randall was the founder of Broadside Press, which published many well-known Black poets. He was one of the foremost voices in African-American literature during the 20th century and was very influential in his mentoring activities. The poems and the short stories show the changes in civil rights and historical events during his 80 years of life, and depict a man who had a deep love for people.

Season of Water and Ice by Donald Lystra, Switch Grass Books/Northern Illinois University. Donald Lystra creates a touching coming-of-age story set in rural northern Michigan in 1957. Bookish loner Danny DeWitt befriends Amber Dwyer, a pregnant teenager who has been abandoned by her boyfriend and rejected by her family and community. Seasons of Water and Ice explores the themes of independence and obligation, courage and surrender, and love and sexuality. The book will appeal to both adult and young adult readers.

Stitches: A Memoir by David Small. W. W. Norton. Socrates says that an unexamined life is a life not worth living. David Small’s heartbreaking story reveals a well-examined life, bringing to light a troubled family and its impact on him as a child, from living in an extremely quiet and depressing environment with angry undertones, to undergoing extremely traumatic throat surgery and waking up unable to speak. A remarkably illustrated story of a child who found refuge in books and in drawing, and, in the end, became his own man.

Travelin’ Man: On the Road and Behind the Scenes with Bob Seger by Tom Weschler. Wayne State University Press. Following Bob Seger’s career from the late 1960s, through such highlights as Beautiful Loser, Live Bullet andNight Moves, and culminating in his 2004 induction in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, readers will eagerly turn the page in this behind-the-scenes photographic look at one of Michigan’s music icons.

Up the Rouge!: Paddling Detroit’s Hidden River by Joel Thurtell. Photographs by Patricia Beck. Wayne State University Press. This is a beautifully photographed story of a journey up Detroit’s Rouge River to investigate whether cleanup efforts are paying off. Two Detroit Free Press journalists undertake a very difficult five-day trip up the river, which involved not just peacefully canoeing but also avoiding getting dunked in a very contaminated river and dragging their canoe over debris and rubbish tossed in the river. Photos show an astonishing number of boats simply abandoned in the river, along with random cars, washing machines and other detritus of civilization.

When March Went Mad: The Game That Transformed Basketball by Seth Davis. Times Books. Thirty years ago, college basketball was not the sport we know today. Not many games were televised nationally, and the NCAA tournament was not the cultural phenomenon it is today. Two exceptional players, Earvin “Magic” Johnson and Larry Bird, almost single-handedly changed everything. Although they played each other only once, in the 1979 NCAA finals, that meeting launched an epic rivalry, transformed the NCAA tournament into the multibillion-dollar event it is today and laid the groundwork for the resurgence of the NBA. Seth Davis’ well-written book explores Bird and Johnson, the 1979 NCAA tournament, and the impact these great players had on the game.

###

The Library of Michigan is part of the Michigan Department of Education. For more information, visit www.michigan.gov/libraryofmichigan.


March 23, 2010

From: Greg Olszta, MDE (Frowarding from Dean Kern - highlights of memo)

CharterEd Notepad

March 23, 2010

Charter School Program National Leadership Competition

For FY 2010, the Department is holding a grant competition for national activities projects listed in section 5205(a) of the ESEA.  Grants for national activities projects under the CSP are highly competitive. Applicants should make a well-reasoned and compelling case for the national significance of the problems or issues that will be the subject of the proposed project and of the approach the project would take to addressing those problems or issues.

For further information, please contact Richard Payton, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Room 4W225, Washington, DC 20202-5970. Telephone: (202) 453-7698 or by e-mail: richard.payton@ed.gov

______________________________


Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.282N
     Dates:
    Applications Available: March 23, 2010.
   Date of Pre-Application Meeting: April 8, 2010.
    Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: May 14, 2010.
    Deadline for Intergovernmental Review: July 12, 2010.
 Purpose of Program: The purpose of the CSP is to increase national understanding of the charter
school model and to expand the number of high-quality charter schools available to students across
the Nation by providing financial assistance for the planning, program design, and initial implementation
of charter schools, and to evaluate the effects of charter schools, including their effects on students,
student academic achievement, staff, and parents. Section 5205 of the Elementary and Secondary
Education Act of 1965, (ESEA) (20 U.S.C. 7221d), authorizes the Secretary to award grants under
the CSP to carry out national activities.
This priority is:     High-Quality Charter Schools in Urban or Rural Areas.
   The Secretary is particularly interested in projects designed to enhance and expand a State's
capacity to support high-quality charter schools in one or more geographic areas, particularly
urban and rural areas, in which a large proportion or number of public schools have been identified
for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring under Title I, Part A of the ESEA. A project
meeting this priority should be based on research evidence and demonstrate effective practices
through one or more of the following types of activities: (1) The dissemination of information on the
implementation of school turnaround and restart models (as described in the Notice of Final
Requirements for the School Improvement Grants published in the Federal Register on December
10, 2009 (74 FR 65618) (SIG Notice)) in charter schools and information on best practices for
turning around a State's persistently lowest-achieving schools under Title I (also as identified
by the State under the SIG notice); (2) opening new charter schools in the vicinity of schools
closed as a consequence of a local educational agency (LEA) implementing a restructuring plan
under section 1116(b)(8) of the ESEA, or schools identified as persistently lowest-achieving,
provided this is done in coordination with the local educational agency (LEA); (3) the identification
and replication of high-performing charter schools in ``high-need communities'', as this term is
defined in section 2151(e)(9)(B) of the ESEA (20 U.S.C. 6651(e)(9)(B)); (4) the creation and
dissemination of models for high-quality authorizing practices that hold charter schools
accountable for increasing student achievement and that provide for their closure if they do not
raise achievement; (5) activities that improve the academic performance of African-American
students, Hispanic students, students with disabilities, English learners, or children from low-income
families; (6) recruitment, training, ongoing professional development, and retention of highly qualified
teachers, including highly qualified mid-career professionals and recent college graduates who have not
majored in education, as teachers in ``high-need'' charter schools (charter schools meeting the
definition of a high-need school in section 2304(d)(3) of the ESEA (20 U.S.C. 6674(d)(3)); or (7)
increasing public or private funding options for charter school facilities and access to existing public
school buildings.
  Type of Award: Discretionary grants.
    Estimated Available Funds: The FY 2010 appropriation for the Charter Schools Program is 
56,031,000, of which an estimated $3,500,000 will be used for this competition. Contingent
upon the availability of funds and the quality of the applications received, we may make
additional awards later in FY 2010 and in FY 2011 from the list of unfunded applications from
this competition.
    Estimated Range of Awards: 
50,000-$750,000 per year.
    Estimated Average Size of Awards: $500,000 per year.
    Estimated Number of Awards: 5-7.
 Note: The Department is not bound by any estimates in this notice.
   Project Period: Up to three years.

III. Eligibility Information

  1. Eligible Applicants: State educational agencies (SEAs) and local educational agencies (LEAs) 
in States with a State statute specifically authorizing the establishment of charter schools; and
public and private non-profit organizations, including non-profit charter management organizations.
Eligible applicants may also apply as a group or consortium.
    2. Cost-Sharing or Matching: This competition does not involve cost sharing or matching.
    3. Annual Meeting Attendance. Applicants approved for funding under this competition must 
attend a two-day meeting for project directors in the Washington, DC area during each year of
the project. Applicants are encouraged to include the cost of attending this meeting in their
proposed budgets.
    5. Funding Restrictions: An eligible applicant receiving a grant under this program may use the
grant funds only for--
    (a) Access to Federal Funds. Disseminating information to charter schools about 
Federal funds they are eligible to receive and other Federal programs in which they
may be eligible to participate; and providing assistance to charter schools in applying
for Federal education funds that are allocated by formula.
    (b) Research. Conducting evaluations or studies on the impact of charter schools on 
student academic achievement and other issues concerning charter schools, such as
teacher qualifications and retention, and the demographic makeup (e.g., age, race, gender,
disability, English learners, and previous public school enrollment) of charter school students.
    (c) Technical Assistance and Planning. Assisting States and charter school developers 
with all aspects of planning, design, and implementing a charter school. Some areas in
which newly created charter schools face challenges include program design, curriculum
development, defining the school's mission, hiring staff, drafting charter applications, student
recruitment and admissions, public relations and community involvement, governance, acquiring
equipment and services, budget and finances, facilities, assessment and accountability, parental
involvement, serving students with disabilities and English learners, and collaborating with other
entities to provide high-quality instruction and services.
    (d) Best or Promising Practices. Disseminating information on best or promising practices
in charter schools to other public schools, including charter schools.
    (e) Facilities. Collecting and disseminating information about programs and financial 
resources available to charter schools for facilities, including information about successful
programs and how charter schools can access private capital.
    (f) Quality Authorizing. Providing technical assistance to authorized public chartering 
agencies in order to increase the number of high-performing charter schools, including
assisting authorized public chartering agencies in designing rigorous application processes;
developing strong accountability and evaluation systems; building or enhancing capacity to
authorize, monitor, and hold accountable charter schools; and closing persistently low-
performing charter schools.
    (g) School Improvement. Assisting LEAs in the planning and startup of charter schools as a 
means of implementing school turnaround or restart intervention models, or both, in persistently
low-performing schools in order to increase student achievement, decrease the achievement
gaps across student subgroups, and increase the rates at which students graduate from high
school prepared for college and careers.
    Award Basis. In determining whether to approve a grant award and the amount of such award,
the Department will consider, among other things, the amount of any carryover funds the applicant
has under an existing CSP grant and the applicant's performance and use of funds under a
previous or existing award under any Department program (34 CFR 75.217(d)(ii) and 75.233(b)).
     VI. Award Administration Information
     1. Award Notices: If your application is successful, we will notify your U.S. Representative
and U.S. Senators and send you a Grant Award Notification (GAN). We may also notify you
informally, also.
    If your application is not evaluated or not selected for funding, we notify you.
    2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements: We identify administrative and national 
policy requirements in the application package and reference these and other requirements
in the Applicable Regulations section of this notice.
    We reference the regulations outlining the terms and conditions of an award in the Applicable 
Regulations section of this notice and include these and other specific conditions in the GAN.
The GAN also incorporates your approved application as part of your binding commitments
under the grant.
    3. Reporting: At the end of your project period, you must submit a final performance report, 
including financial information, as directed by the Secretary. If you receive a multi-year award,
you must submit an annual performance report that provides the most current performance
and financial expenditure information as directed by the Secretary in 34 CFR 75.118. The
Secretary may also require more frequent performance reports under 34 CFR 75.720(c).
For specific requirements on reporting, please go to http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/appforms.html.
    4. Performance Measures: The goal of the CSP is to support the creation and development 
of a large number of high-quality charter schools that are free from State or local rules that
inhibit flexible operation, are held accountable for enabling students to reach challenging State
performance standards, and are open to all students.
The Secretary has two performance indicators to measure progress toward this goal: (1) 
the number of charter schools in operation around the Nation, and (2) the percentage of
charter school students who are achieving at or above the proficient level on State
examinations in mathematics and reading/language arts. Additionally, the Secretary has
established the following measure to examine the efficiency of the CSP:
Federal cost per student in implementing a successful school (defined as a school in operation 
for three or more consecutive years).
    All grantees will be expected, as applicable, to submit an annual performance report documenting 
their contribution in assisting the Department in meeting these performance measures.

VII. Agency Contact 
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard Payton, U.S. Department of Education, 
400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Room 4W225, Washington, DC 20202-5970. Telephone: (202)
453-7698 or by e-mail: richard.payton@ed.gov.
    If you use a TDD, call the FRS, toll free, at 1-800-877-8339.

VIII. Other Information 
       Note:  The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. 
Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal
Regulations is available on GPO Access at: http://www.gpoaccess.gov/nara/index.html.

March 23, 2010

MPEFA State Aid Note

Dear Public School Academies and Management Companies:

The Michigan Public Educational Facilities Authority (MPEFA) is pleased to announce its eighth annual State Aid Note program.

The MPEFA State Aid Note for Public School Academies offers a simplified borrowing process to fund cash flow needs for operating purposes. If you anticipate the need to borrow to meet cash flow requirements in the 20 I0-11 fiscal year, please complete an application package, which is available at the MPEFA website: www.michigan.gov/mpefa. The application, including cash flow schedules, audits, budgets, etc. is due Friday, May 14 th

The anticipated funding date is July 14,2010.

The MPEFA State Aid Note provides Public School Academies with a borrowing rate equal to or less than other financing options. It is the goal of MPEFA to finance Public School Academy note borrowing at the lowest possible interest rate. Current conditions in the capital markets pose significant challenges, however MPEFA will continue to work diligently toward this goal.

The note rate offered to each participating Public School Academy includes all of the costs of borrowing except fees related to local note counsel.

We look forward to providing your Public School Academy with a competitive and convenient financing source for its cash flow needs. Please contact Janet Liesman or me at (517) 335-0994 with any questions related to the 2010 State Aid Note.

Kathleen K. O'Keefe
Assistant Director
Michigan Public Educational Facilities Authority


March 22, 2010

MDE OFFICIAL COMMUNICATION

Memo #041-10 – Indirect Cost Rates
The Michigan Department of Education is pleased to announce that current indirect cost rate information is now available.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Indirect_Cost_Rates_3-25-10_315723_7.pdf

Memo #042-10 - Updated Pupil Auditing Manual
With the assistance of a referent group of Intermediate School District auditors, the Department of Education has updated the Pupil Auditing Manual to incorporate recent changes in the Pupil Accounting Manual. http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Pupil_Auditing_Manual_Memo_March_2010_315725_7.pdf

Memo #043-10 - Food Recalls: Free E-mail Notification
The purpose of this memorandum is to provide information regarding an automated e-mail notification system for food recalls. The Michigan Department of Education (MDE) is strongly encouraging school personnel needing food recall information to sign up for this free e-mail notification and update service to ensure all schools are aware of current food safety concerns. Foodsafety.gov provides subscribers with instant notification on all food recalls and alerts as well as food borne illness outbreaks.

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Food_Recall_E-mail_Notification_32510_315729_7.pdf


March 16, 2010

FROM: Carol L. Wolenberg, Deputy Superintendent

Re: Federal Grant Opportunity Investing in Innovation Fund (I3)

The Investing in Innovation Fund, established under section 14007 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), provides competitive grants to applicants with a record of improving student achievement and attainment in order to expand the implementation of, and investment in, innovative practices. These practices must demonstrate an impact on improving student achievement or student growth, closing achievement gaps, decreasing dropout rates, increasing high school graduation rates, or increasing college enrollment and completion rates.

Individual school districts or groups of districts can apply for I3 grants, and entrepreneurial nonprofits can join with school districts or a consortium of schools to submit applications. To qualify for the competitive grants, applicants will need to address one of the four areas that are driving the Obama administration's school reform agenda: supporting effective teachers and principals; improving the use of data to accelerate student achievement; complementing the implementation of standards and assessments that prepare students for success in college and careers; and turning around persistently low-performing schools.

Applicants will receive a competitive preference if their project addresses one or more of the following priorities: improving outcomes for young children; expanding students' access to college and preparing them for success in college; addressing the unique needs of students with disabilities and of limited English proficient students; and serving schools in rural areas.

Once identified as an award recipient, successful applicants will need to demonstrate how their programs will be sustainable after their federal grants are completed as well as find a 20 percent cash or in-kind match of the federal award from the private sector. To assist recipients in their efforts to find private matches and to serve the larger purpose of creating an innovation community, the United States Department of Education (USDOED) has launched an online community, the Open Innovation Portal.

Eligible participants must submit to the USDOED a notice of intent to apply by April 1, 2010. Applications will be due May 11, 2010 and grants will be awarded in September.

In the coming weeks, officials from the USDOED Office of Innovation and Improvement will hold informational workshops in Atlanta, Baltimore, and Denver that will be web-accessible; however, early registration is required. Registration can be found at: http://www.fsaregistration.ed.gov/profile/web/index.cfm?PKwebID=0x9192363b1&varPage=agenda

Additional information on I3 grants can be found at: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/innovation/index.html

Questions regarding the Investing in Innovation Fund (I3) may be directed to Margo Anderson, U.S. Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Room 4W302, Washington, DC 20202-5900, Telephone: (202) 453-7122 or by email: i3@ed.gov or John VanWagoner, Consultant; Michigan Department of Education, Office of Education Improvement and Innovation, telephone: (517) 373-9717 or by email: vanwagonerj@michigan.gov


Week of March 15, 2010 MDE OFFICAL COMMUNICATION 

– Memo #037-10 - DS-4168-B, 2009-2010 District Report of Planned Number of Days and Clock Hours of Pupil Instruction
The DS-4168-B, Planned Number of Days and Clock Hours of Pupil Instruction, is a required form due to the Michigan Department of Education by April 15, 2010.  This report is available via the Internet.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Days_and_Clock_Hours_03-18-10_314967_7.pdf

– Memo #038-10 - Helping Students Come Prepared to Get a Driver’s License (Forwarding on behalf of the Michigan Department of State)http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/SOS_428_Cooperation_Letter_3-16-2010_with_Att_314968_7.pdf

 – Memo #039-10 - Response to Intervention Conference
The first one day Response to Intervention and School Improvement Conference will be held on May 4, 2010, at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Dearborn, Michigan. The conference is intended for District, School, ISD/RESA personnel, and Professional Organization Leaders and is provided at no cost. http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/OEII_Response_to_Intervention_Conf_Memo_3-18-10_314969_7.pdf  

– Memo #040-10 - Statewide Literacy Plan
The Michigan Department of Education (MDE) is currently forming a State Literacy Leadership Team (MiLitTeam) to develop and design a comprehensive Statewide Literacy Plan (MiLitPlan). The Literacy Plan will inform Michigan’s work with literacy pre-K through adult education and position the department to develop competitive grant applications to improve literacy. A Statewide Literacy Plan and the formation of a State Literacy Leadership Team, representative of key stakeholders and professional organizations, are required in the proposed Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Title I legislation (LEARN Act).
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/OEII_Statewide_Literacy_Plan_03-18-10_315027_7.pdf


March 14, 2010

FROM: Greg Olszta, MDE (Forwarded From Dean Kern, US DoE)

 SPECIAL INNOVATOR ALERT: INVESTING IN INNOVATION (i3) FUND GUIDELINES AVAILABLE
(Announcement also Featured in CharterED Notepad March 13, 2010)

On Monday, March 8, 2010, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced the final priorities and released the grant application for the Investing in Innovation Fund (i3). The fund, which is part of the historic $5 billion investment in school reform in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), will support the development of path-breaking new ideas, the validation of approaches that have demonstrated promise, and the scale-up of the nation's most successful and proven education innovations.

The press release announcing the launch of i3 is available at the Department of Education's Web site at http://www2.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2010/03/03082010.html.

The i3 Web site (http://www2.ed.gov/programs/innovation/applicant.html) includes a variety of useful materials, including:

  • Notice of Final Priorities
  • Notice Inviting Applications
  • Application Package
  • Frequently Asked Questions and other supporting documents as they become available

As you know from the March Innovator feature article, the Department of Education also recently launched an online community, the Open Innovation Portal. This is the first national forum within which entrepreneurs, education stakeholders of all types, and funders can partner to develop and fund innovative ideas in the education sector.

All questions about i3 may be sent to: i3@ed.gov.


MEAP Reading and Math Scores Continue to Climb, Achievement Gap Narrows

March 12, 2010

Student reading scores on the statewide Michigan Educational Assessment Program (MEAP) test rose in all grades compared to the previous year, while the disparity in academic performance between groups of students has narrowed significantly compared to 2005, the Michigan Department of Education announced today.

Students gained three to eight percent in every grade except fourth, where the gain was one percent. Ninety percent of third graders, 84 percent of fourth graders and 85 percent of fifth grade students attained basic proficiency. Students in sixth grade climbed from 80 to 88 percent, seventh graders increased three points to 82 percentage and eighth graders increased from 76 to 83 percent.

For the fifth consecutive year since Michigan began implementing more rigorous K-8 Grade Level Content Expectations, math scores for students in grades 3-6 have continued to rise. The largest gains occurred among low-income students, students of color, those with Limited English Proficiency, and Students With Disabilities.

Topping the achievement for students on the math test, 95 percent of Michigan third graders attained basic proficiency in math, while 92 percent of fourth graders, 79 percent of fifth graders, and 82 percent of sixth graders also met the basic proficiency levels set for math. Math scores for seventh and eighth graders declined slightly after four consecutive years of growth.

"A world-class education is critical for our children in the 21st century economy," Governor Jennifer M. Granholm said. "These all are very positive trends – and our kids’ academic achievements are significant to the success of our state as we continue to move forward to grow and diversify our state’s economy."

In math and reading, students are tested on curriculum standards, known as Grade Level Content Expectations, implemented in the 2004-05 school year. They have been recognized by independent reviewers across the nation to be among the most rigorous standards in the country.

"These are the results we have been expecting when we established statewide curriculum standards and base our tests on those standards," state Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan said. "Teachers have more clarity on the basic standards that students should know and understand, and when they are taught and learned, students can achieve."

A five-year comparison of MEAP reading scores show students in all grades and student groups made gains in reading from 2005 to 2009. Only one group, Limited English Proficient students in fourth grade, showed a slight decline.

The reading achievement gap between white students and students of color narrowed, especially for third, sixth and eighth grade students from 2005 to 2009. The largest decrease for both groups occurred in eighth grade where the achievement gap between white and African-American students was closed from 26.4 percentage points in 2005 to 10.4 in 2009. The gap between white and Hispanic eighth grade students declined from 21.5 percentage points in 2005 to 11.1 in 2009.

A five-year comparison of MEAP math scores also reveals students in all grades and all student groups showed gains. The largest proficiency gains occurred in grade seven were African-American, Hispanic, and Economically Disadvantaged students and Students With Disabilities increased 30 percentage points or more.

The math achievement gap between white students and students of color narrowed by over 10 percentage points for students in most grades from 2005 to 2009. The largest decrease for both groups occurred in seventh grade where the achievement gap between white and African-American students was cut from 41 percentage points in 2005 to 25 percentage points in 2009. The gap between white and Hispanic seventh grade students reduced from 27.1 percentage points in 2005 to 12.3 in 2009.

The Fall 2009 MEAP results also include scores in the subject areas of science and social studies. In science, tested in grades five and eight, the percentage of students scoring at proficient or above dropped, compared to previous years. Eighty-one percent of fifth graders attained proficiency in science, compared to 83 percent in Fall 2008 and 81 percent in fall 2007. Seventy-six percent of eighth graders attained proficiency compared to 77 percent in Fall 2008 and 79 percent in Fall 2007.

Social studies, tested at grades six and nine, saw one-percent decreases in scores over the previous year with 73 percent of sixth graders attaining proficiency compared to 74 percent in 2008, and 71 percent of ninth graders attaining proficiency compared to 72 percent the previous year.

In Fall 2009, Michigan administered a pilot of a new writing test for grades four and seven only, replacing the former writing assessment which tested students in grades 3-8. By reducing the number of grade levels tested, the state will be able to concentrate resources on a longer, more robust assessment, providing more information and, accordingly, a more complete picture of the writing skills possessed by Michigan students. The new writing test will be administered for the first time in Fall 2010. Whereas the previous writing test had 23 points, the new writing test will have 50 points, and will give much better information to teachers and parents about what students know and can do in the area of writing.

All MEAP scores are divided into four performance levels: Not Proficient, Partially Proficient, Proficient, and Advanced. Students who place in either the Proficient or Advanced levels are considered to be "proficient or above" in that subject. Proficiency measures a student at a basic level of knowledge in a given curriculum area. Michigan students are tested each October on skills learned through the end of the previous year.

While a majority of students in Michigan participate in the MEAP, it is not appropriate for some Students with Disabilities (SWD). For that reason, the state developed MI-Access, the state’s alternate assessment program.

There are three MI-Access assessments in which students with disabilities can take part: Participation; Supported Independence; and Functional Independence. The assessment a student takes is determined by that student’s Individualized Education Program Team (IEPT) based upon their consideration of the student’s cognitive functioning level, level of independence, curriculum and instruction.

# # #

To view complete MEAP results, go to www.michigan.gov/meapand click on the MEAP results link.

To view complete MI-Access results, go to www.michigan.gov/mi-access and click on "Statewide Results, Demographic Summary and Item Analysis Reports (State, District, School) in the box labeled State Assessment Reports for SWD.


March 10, 2010

FROM: Sally Vaughn, Ph.D. Deputy Superintendent/Chief Academic Officer

SUBJECT: Public Feedback on the Draft K-12 English Language Arts and Mathematics Common Core State Standards

The draft K-12 Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts (ELA) and mathematics are available for public comment until April 2, 2010. You may access the survey from the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) website at www.michigan.gov/mde/0,1607,7-140-28753---,00.html. You will have the opportunity to comment on the K-12 Common Core State Standards. Since it was time to update the mathematics and ELA standards in our regular review and revision cycle, Michigan became actively involved with the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

The Common Core State Standards Initiative is a state-led effort coordinated by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) including 48 states, the District of Columbia, and two territories that committed to developing common core state standards. The college and career readiness standards for mathematics and ELA, the first step in this initiative, were released for public comment in September 2009. Both sets of standards, college and career readiness and K-12 standards for mathematics and ELA, are expected to be finalized in early 2010.

      The common core college and career readiness and the K-12 standards define the knowledge and skills students need to succeed in entry-level, credit-bearing, academic college courses and in workforce training programs. The standards:

  • Build upon strengths and lessons of standards from all states.
  • Provide a comprehensive, cohesive, vertically aligned series of learning progressions that lead to a common definition of college and career readiness.
  • Align with college and work expectations and are rigorous, internationally benchmarked, and research-based.
  • Align well with Michigan’s ELA and Mathematics Grade Level Content Expectations and High School Content Expectations at the standard and topic levels.

Experts from Achieve, Inc., ACT, the College Board, the National Association of State Boards of Education, and the State Higher Education Executive Officers provided advice and guidance on the initiative. The work group for K-12 standards development is composed of individuals representing multiple stakeholders and a range of expertise and experience in assessment, curriculum design, cognitive development, early childhood, early numeracy, child development, English language acquisition, special education, and elementary, secondary, and postsecondary education. The feedback group provides information backed by research to inform the standards development process by offering expert input on draft documents. This initiative provides more global and national input and expertise than what is typical of the standards development process in most states.

Please contact Deborah Clemmons at 517/241-2479 or clemmonsd@michigan.gov with any questions.


March 8, 2010

MDE Official Communication

Memo #033-10 – Free Advanced Placement Tests for Qualified Students; Free International Baccalaureate Exams and Registration Fees for Qualified Students
To increase access to Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) tests for low-income students, the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) has applied for and received a federal grant. http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/OEII_AP_test_fee_reduction_announcement_sy0910_03-11-10_314229_7.pdf

Memo #034-10 – Grant Opportunity for Early Childhood Education and Family Services
The Michigan Department of Education is pleased to announce a Training and Technical Assistance for William F. Goodling Even Start Family Literacy Programs grant opportunity. The purpose of the grant is to create a comprehensive, integrated, responsive system of technical support for Michigan Even Start Family Literacy projects.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/ECEFS_Even_Start_Technical_Asst_Webinar_03-11-10_314232_7.pdf


March 5, 2010

STATE BOARD HOLDS FINAL PUBLIC FORUM TO HEAR IDEAS FOR EDUCATION FINANCING REFORM

LANSING – Tuesday’s meeting of the State Board of Education will complete a series of public forums asking Michigan’s leading education stakeholders, economists, and policy analysts to share recommendations for stabilizing Michigan’s funding system for pre-K, K-12, and higher education.

The input will help inform recommendations the State Board will make for long-term structural reforms to better support effective education and higher education systems.

Presenting at the Tuesday, March 9, Board meeting -- 9:30 am, at the 4th Floor, Hannah Building, State Board of Education Board room will be:

• John Bebow, Executive Director, Center for Michigan

• David Hecker, President, American Federation of Teachers - Michigan

• Iris Salters, President, Michigan Education Association

• Sabrina Keeley, Chief Operating Officer, Business Leaders for Michigan

• Mike Murray, Superintendent, Suttons Bay Area Schools - Representing the Consensus for Change Think Tank

"With looming budget shortfalls for next year, and the inability of the state to resolve the education financing problems of Michigan, it is imperative that Michigan develop long-term structural remedies," said State Board of Education President Kathleen Straus.

The Board expects to make its recommendations about how Michigan should remake its education-related revenue base, investment priorities, and spending reforms to the state Legislature and Governor in April.

"These public forums have been strategic in bringing in a broad spectrum of ideas and philosophies for the State Board to gather and glean a solid and balanced recommendation to the Legislature," said state Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan.


Week of March 1, 2010

MDE Official Communication

Memo #027-10 - Talent Pool Development
The Michigan Department of Education maintains a file of emerging classroom leaders that consists of a cadre of distinguished teachers. These educators may be considered for membership on advisory boards and task forces, as well as candidates for special recognition programs. Your recommendations will identify educators who will be of great value to your community and state and who may also ultimately receive prestigious recognition. http://bit.ly/a15RmP


Memo #028-10 -
Civil Rights Compliance Requirements for Participation in the National School Lunch Program School Year 2009-2010
All School Food Authorities (SFA) must fulfill requirements for compliance with the Civil Rights rules to participate in federally assisted school food service programs. http://bit.ly/b1XrVo


Memo #029-10 -
Alternate Count Date Clarification
The Department issued a memorandum dated February 8, 2010, in anticipation of a snowstorm on February 10, 2010, (the regularly scheduled Supplemental Count Date) that granted a waiver for an alternate count date to districts that were not in session on February 10, 2010, due to the storm. This memorandum is to provide additional clarification of the alternate count date policy. http://bit.ly/bP4BCq

Memo #030-10 – Field Review of the Proposed Standards for the Preparation of Teachers of American Sign Language (ASL) as a World Language
The Michigan Department of Education is pleased to notify you of the development of proposed standards for the preparation of teachers of American Sign Language (ASL) as a world language. http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/OPPS_ASL_Field_Review_memo_03-04-10_313418_7.pdf

Memo #031-10 - ARRA Section 1512 Report Due April 2, 2010
The next American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Section 1512 quarterly report is due April 2, 2010.  Section 1512 reporting must be completed quarterly in the Michigan Electronic Grants System (MEGS) for each ARRA grant award received.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/ARRA_1512_Report_3-4-10_313425_7.pdf


February 19, 2010

Subject: Media Clarification

A number of media outlets recently have published what they referred to as schools in the “Bottom 5 percent of failing schools.” Even though we have informed them that this is not the final list of the “Bottom 5 percent,” there still is a mistaken public perception that it is “the” list.

Here is a quick clarification on this issue:

In the past few months, much public discussion about education reform has occurred that has included speculation about which schools would fall within the 5% lowest performing schools.  A draft list was required in the federal Race to the Top application. That preliminary list was an attachment to Michigan’s Race to the Top application, and thus made public.  This list was created from the best information we had at that time as to what the federal government might use to define the “Bottom 5 percent.” 

The guidance from the U.S. Department of Education (USDOED) has changed significantly since then and the Michigan Department of Education is working diligently with USDOED to create the criteria that will meet the state legislative requirements and the federal requirements.  Once this work is completed and approved by USDOED, a final list will be created and published, along with the criteria used to create the list (as required by state law).   

The preliminary draft list referenced by the media which is the focus of this discussion should not be used or considered as the definitive list of affected schools.  That list is outdated and inaccurate, based on current stats and guidance from the feds.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Martin Ackley, Director
Office of Communications
Michigan Department of Education


MDE Official Communication Week of February 15, 2010 

Memo #017-10 – Secure Central Registry and State Board Continuing Education Unit

Through a partnership between the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) and the Michigan Institute for Educational Management (MIEM), a secure central registry (SCR) has been designed and will be implemented for individuals who utilize SB-CEUs toward Professional Education Certificate renewal, School Counselor License renewal, School Psychologist Certificate renewal, Administrator Certificate renewal, and Administrator continued employment requirements. MIEM will be responsible for operating and maintaining the system.

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/OPPS_sb-ceu_central_registry_02-18-10_311675_7.pdf

Memo #018-10 - Statewide Articulation Agreement Between Michigan Department of Education and Davenport University

Career and technical education students who attend Davenport University could enter the college with 40 credits toward a degree. The statewide articulation agreement, signed earlier this month, between the Michigan Department of Education and Davenport is the first of its kind. Although there are many regional agreements with community colleges and select four year public institutions, this agreement is unique because it is available to any student in Michigan and the credits are awarded in bachelor degree programs.

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Articulation_Agreement_with_Davenport_311677_7.pdf

Memo #019-10 - Guidelines for Awarding Credit in Career and Technical Education (CTE, Humanities, and Other Delivery Models)

The implementation of the Michigan Merit curriculum graduation requirements and Project ReImagine has led to continued discussions on awarding academic credit for high school classes or courses that occur outside the usual structure and delivery method.

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Guidelines_for_Awarding_Credit_311678_7.pdf

Memo #020-10 - National School Breakfast Week, March 8-12, 2010

The Michigan State Board of Education has adopted a resolution to recognize “National School Breakfast Week” from March 8-12, 2010. Please join the Michigan Department of Education in recognizing this special week and the role school nutrition programs play in the lives of America’s children.

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Natl_School_Breakfast_Week_Memo_311679_7.pdf


Subject: MDE Official Communication- Week of February 8, 2010

– Memo #011-10 - Taiwan-Chinese Language Teacher Program and Administrator Visit

In March 2006, the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Ministry of Education in Taiwan (MET) by which up to 15 experienced and/or newly certified Michigan elementary teachers were given the opportunity to study and teach in Taiwanese schools for a full academic year. The next step in this collaboration is to recruit teachers from Taiwan to teach Chinese language and culture to Michigan students. Considering the world language graduation requirements, interest in internationalizing education, and increased awareness of the global economy, this opportunity is very timely. Schools in Taiwan are also readily available to begin “Sister School” relationships with schools here in Michigan.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/OPPS_Taiwan_Chinese_Language_Admin_Prgm_2010_310701_7.pdf

– Memo #012-10 - DS-4898 – PSA Preliminary Pupil Membership Count Requirements for Public School Academies (PSAs)

In an effort to reduce paperwork, the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) has revised its policy related to the submission of form DS-4898. In the future, this form will be required only during the first two years of a PSA's operation, or as additional grade levels are added.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/DS_4898_Corollary_2_310703_7.pdf

– Memo #013-10 - Ensuring Timely Access to Federal Formula Funds for New and Expanding Public School Academies (PSAs)

Pursuant to federal statute and regulation, the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) is responsible for ensuring that public school academies (PSAs) that open for the first time or significantly expand their enrollment receive the proportionate amount of federal formula funds to which they are entitled.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Notice_Requirements_PSAs_2-9-10_310705_7.pdf

– Memo #014-10 – NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Michigan Department of Education, Office of Early Childhood Education and Family Services, will conduct public hearings to receive comment on the proposed new Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)/Early On® Funding Formula and present its Michigan Annual Performance Report for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2008 for public review.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Early_On_Notice_of_Public_Hearing_310707_7.pdf

– Memo #015-10 - MEAP-Access One-Year Delay

The MEAP-Access assessment was operationally administered for the first time in Fall 2009. Low reliabilities from the first operational administration showed a need for more extensive modification of MEAP items to provide access to the content for the intended participants in MEAP-Access. The Michigan Department of Education (MDE) has spent considerable energy in planning for the additional modifications to be in place for Fall 2010. It has become clear, after internal discussions and discussions with contractors, that attempting to put the modifications in place could possibly result in insufficiently high reliabilities in 2010 as well.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/MEAP-Access_One-Year_Delay_310708_7.pdf

– Memo #016-10 –The ARRA and the Whistleblower Protection Act

Section 1553 of Division A, Title XV of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L. 111-5, provides protections for certain individuals who make specific disclosures about uses of Recovery Act funds.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/ARRA_and_Whistleblower_Protection_Act_310866_7.pdf


February 8, 2010

Subject: Waivers for the Supplemental Pupil Membership Counts Held on Wednesday, February 10, 2010, Due to Inclement Weather Conditions

The state Department of Management and Budget has notified MDE that a winter storm warning or watch is in effect from Tuesday, February 9, 2010 through Wednesday, February 10, 2010. Wednesday, February 10, 2010, is the Supplemental Count Date for the 2009-2010 school year. Section 6(6)a, of the State School Aid Act, reads as follows: “Except as otherwise provided in this act, in addition to the pupil membership count day, there shall be a supplemental pupil count of the number of full-time equated pupils in grades K-12 actually enrolled and in regular daily attendance in a district or intermediate district on the second Wednesday in February or, for a district that is not in session on that day due to conditions not within the control of school authorities, with the approval of the superintendent, the immediately following day on which the district is in session. For the purposes of this act, the day on which the supplemental pupil count is conducted is the supplemental count day.” The purpose of this memorandum is to grant a waiver for those districts that experienced the situation described above to use the immediately following day after February 10, 2010 which the district is in session as the alternative supplemental count day for those buildings that are not in session on Wednesday, February 10, 2010.

February 4, 2010

Subject: MDE Official Communication - Week of February 1, 2010


Memo #008-10 – Grant Opportunity for Early Childhood Education and Family Services

The Michigan Department of Education is pleased to announce a William F. Goodling Even Start Family Literacy Program grant opportunity. The goal of the William F. Goodling Even Start Family Literacy Program is to develop demonstration projects that focus on providing intensive family literacy services. These funds are geared toward improving the literacy skills of parents, helping them become full partners in educating their children, and assisting children to reach their full potential as learners. Program models must include adult education, early childhood education, parent education and parent-child educational activities. A local or intermediate school district or a public school academy joined in partnership with a public or private nonprofit, community-based agency or institution of higher education may apply for a grant. It is anticipated that funds totaling approximately $2.3 million will be forwarded to Michigan from the U.S. Department of Education, $418,000 of which may be awarded for new grants, once obligation to continuation grants is met.  http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/ECEFS_Even_Start_Grant_310110_7.pdf

Memo #009-10 – Michigan Department of Education (MDE) Guidelines for Budget and Salary/ Compensation Transparency Reporting Pursuant to MCL 388.1618(2)

With the purpose of promoting transparency as it relates to expenditures made by Michigan’s public schools, the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) Guidelines for posting financial data to district websites as required by the State School Aid Act (MCL 388.1618(2)) are attached. These guidelines were developed with input from the House and Senate Fiscal Agencies, the State Budget Office, and representatives from the Michigan School Business Officials.  http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Budget_Salary_Compensation_Memo_310143_7.zip

Attached to this email was the “Budget and Salary/Compensation Transparency Reporting” icon badge to be used on each district’s main home page.


January 29, 2010

Subject: Hunger Doesn’t Take A Summer Vacation More Sponsors Needed To Make A Real Difference in the Lives of Hundreds of Thousands of Hungry Michigan Children


The Michigan Department of Education (MDE) is looking for community sponsors to run summer food programs to prevent more than 510,000 children in Michigan from going hungry when school lunchrooms close for the summer.

The Summer Food Service Program could fill the summer hunger gap for hundreds of thousands of children if more sponsors are signed up to run the food program. Last year, out of the over 510,000 low-income Michigan children who were eligible, only around 84,000 (16.5 percent) were able to eat free meals or snacks at approved summer food program sites in their neighborhoods.

In stressing the importance of sponsoring these crucial summer food programs for children, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan said: “Many families across Michigan are struggling, and we can’t have children going hungry in the summer when programs like this are available. I am calling on schools, churches, and local government and civic organizations to step up and have a positive impact on the lives and health of children in their community by being a Summer Food Service Program sponsor.”

Research shows a direct relationship between good nutrition and learning.

The Summer Food Service Program is a key building block in Michigan communities to develop healthy, happy kids who are ready to learn.

“The need is there and the food is available,” Flanagan said. “We just need more locations around the state to serve the children.” Sponsors receive federal payments for both the meals served to children and the administrative costs of serving the meals. New sponsors will receive free training and technical assistance from MDE.

The Summer Food Service Program serves nutritious meals to children up to age 18 living in low-income areas (where 50 percent or more of the students qualify for free or reduced price school meals). The program can operate in schools, public housing centers, playgrounds, camps, parks, and faith-based facilities.

Sponsors can be public school districts or nonprofit private schools; public or private nonprofit residential summer camps; local, county or state government agencies; colleges or universities; or private nonprofit organizations.

To sponsor the program this summer, organizations need to contact MDE by March 31, 2010.

Applications and sponsor information may be obtained from MDE’s Grants Coordination and School Support office, Summer Food Service Program, 608 W. Allegan Street, P.O. Box 30008,Lansing, Michigan 48909, 517-373-3347; or on the MDE Website at: www.michigan.gov/sfsp.

The Summer Food Service Program, administered by MDE through funds from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is available to children regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability.

January 29, 2010

Subject: MDE Official Communication

Week of January 25, 2010

**URGENT – TIME SENSITIVE:Memo #007-10 Waivers of Title I School Improvement Grant Requirements

The United States Department of Education (USED) has released the application for School Improvement Grants under Section 1003(g) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). The grants, through state educational agencies (SEAs) and local educational agencies (LEAs), are for use in Title I schools identified for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring. These schools must demonstrate the greatest need for, and the strongest commitment to, use of the funds in providing adequate resources that will substantially raise student achievement, enable the schools to make adequate yearly progress (AYP), and exit identification/improvement status.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/OEII_LEA_Comment_Request_SIG_Waivers_1-28-10_309120_7.pdf


January 27, 2010

Subject: Michigan State Board Member Chosen to Serve on National Panel to Make Policy Recommendations on Federal Education Legislation

Alexandria, VA – The National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE) is pleased to announce that Casandra Ulbrich of Rochester Hills, MI, who is a member of the Michigan State Board of Education, has been chosen to serve on the NASBE Governmental Affairs Committee (GAC), the entity responsible for developing federal policy recommendations and communicating with Congress and federal officials about the education reform priorities of state boards of education.

The Governmental Affairs Committee helps state board members understand, influence, and plan for federal education policies. In its efforts to affect national education policymaking, NASBE works to ensure that it represents the views of its members to the executive and legislative branches of the federal government, as well as to associations representing governors, state legislators, school administrators, principals, local school boards, teachers, and parents.

“This is a time of great flux in American public education. The Administration is advancing its plans for education reform, the wheels have been set in motion for the approval of common standards in most states, and the Elementary and Secondary Education Act will likely come up for renewal in 2010, with broad changes made to the existing law that will directly impact the states,” said NASBE Executive Director Brenda Welburn. “The Governmental Affairs Committee amplifies NASBE’s collective voice to members of Congress and the U.S. Department of Education. We look forward to the input and guidance the GAC will deliver to NASBE and state boards as these processes move forward.”

As a member of the 20-member panel, Ms. Ulbrich will meet with other state education leaders, national policymakers, federal lawmakers, and education reform experts during a series of meetings, events and communications during the course of this year to share their state’s experiences and perspective, analyze federal education initiatives, promote state board of education priorities, and serve as a state education resource to congressional offices and staff.

*** The National Association of State Boards of Education represents America's state and territorial boards of education. NASBE exists to strengthen State Boards as the preeminent educational policymaking bodies for citizens and students. For more, visit www.nasbe.org.

January 25, 2010

Subject: CMU Launches Competitive Charter Application Process

Phase I applications due by March 18, 2010

The Center for Charter Schools at Central Michigan University today launched its first competitive charter application process since the enactment of the new “Schools of Excellence” legislation signed by Governor Jennifer M. Granholm on January 4.

This new bi-partisan law, spearheaded by Senator Buzz Thomas (D) Detroit, provides many unique chartering opportunities and employs a revolutionary “Smart Cap” approach to expanding high performing charter schools. Also included in the legislation are opportunities for the formation of two new cyber schools and 10 new “innovation” schools.

“This new legislation provides students and parents greater educational options and encourages high performing school operators to come to Michigan and replicate their success,” said Jim Goenner, executive director, The Center for Charter Schools. “We look forward to the opportunities this new legislation presents and using the experience and expertise we have developed to create more great schools for more children – especially those in greatest need.”

Applications for Phase I of the competitive application process will be accepted through March 18, 2010.

“Central Michigan University boldly became the state’s first university authorizer back in 1994 and since that time we have researched, implemented and refined the way charter schools operate and authorizers oversee and support the schools they charter,” added Goenner. “Through the years, each application cycle has yielded more creative and quality applications. I anticipate this cycle will bring in even more promising proposals.”

As Michigan’s leading authorizer, CMU is looking for applications that demonstrate a promising vision, a quality academic program, and a sound business plan, along with the ability to successfully launch and operate a school that will passionately pursue excellence for all children.

The application can be downloaded from the Center home page at: www.TheCenterForCharters.org.

CMU became the first university in the nation to charter a school in 1994. Today, CMU is the largest authorizer in Michigan and the largest university-authorizer in the nation – chartering 58 public schools, serving more than 30,000 schoolchildren.

January 21, 2010

Subject: MDE Official Communication

Week of January 18, 2010

Memo #003-09 – 2010-2011 School Garden Mini-Grant Application
The Michigan Department of Education is pleased to announce the release of the Michigan Team Nutrition School Garden Mini-Grant opportunity. This is a competitive grant program targeting school buildings participating in the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Applicant schools must contain at least one of the following grades: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12. We encourage schools in your district to apply. The application deadline is January 29, 2010.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Mini_grant_apps_1-14-10_308092_7.pdf

Memo #004-09 – Reporting 2008-09 School Level Expenditures
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 requires all Local Education Agencies (LEAs) that received ARRA Title I, Part A funds to submit a school-by-school listing of per pupil educational expenses from State and local sources during the 2008-2009 school year. The United States Department of Education (USED) expanded this requirement under the authority of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to include all LEAs receiving Title I funds during the 2008-09 school year. The purpose of the collection is to examine the extent to which school-level education resources are distributed equitably within and across school districts.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Reporting_School_Level_Expenditures_1-21-10_308127_7.pdf

Memo #005-09 – 2009 -2010 Middle College Partnership Grant
The Michigan Department of Education (MDE) is pleased to announce the 2009-2010 Middle College Partnership Grant. Approximately $500,000 will be made available for this initiative. The detailed grant announcement and application instructions can be found at: http://www.michigan.gov/mde-grants under the “What’s New” section. This is a competitive grant program targeted to Intermediate School Districts (ISDs), Project ReImagine Demonstration Districts, or a district of the first class in a consortium with a state public community college/university and an accredited hospital or other appropriate entity representing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) employment opportunities to create a Middle College focused on Health Sciences or STEM.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/OCTE_Middle_College_Application_Information_2009-2010_308164_7.zip 

Memo #006-09 – National School Lunch Program Verification Summary Report
Annually, each Local Educational Agency (LEA) is required to select and verify a sample of its School Year 2009-2010 applications for Free and Reduced-Priced School Meal Program benefits by November 15. The outcome of these verification activities must be reported to the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) via the Web-based Local Educational Agency Review System (LEARS). The LEARS Verification Summary Report is due March 1, 2010.
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Lears_Memo_to_LEAS_1-21-10_308165_7.pdf


January 14, 2010

Subject: MDE Official Communication


Beginning with this communication, all Michigan Department of Education “MDE Official Communications” will be sent to districts only one day a week, if necessary. This is in response to feedback from school districts and our efforts to streamline our systems and make them more efficient. There may be occasions when URGENT messages may need to go out to districts that will occur on other days of the week, but we expect those types of communications to be rare.

MDE Official Communications will be sent on Thursdays of each week and will include a brief description of each memo, accompanied by an electronic link to each memo from the MDE website.

We hope this will improve communications between MDE and local school districts, and relieve any “memo fatigue” our local partners have been enduring.

Martin Ackley, Director
Office of Communications
Michigan Department of Education

Inclusive schools celebrate children in all their diversity. Together is Better! Learn more at www.inclusiveschools.org 
***********************************************************************
Week of January 11, 2010

MDE Official Communication – Memo #001-10 – 2010 Michigan School Garden Survey
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/School_Garden_Survey_Memo_Jan_2010_2_307540_7.pdf

MDE Official Communication – Memo #002-10 – New School Immunization Requirements for 2010-2011
(Forwarding on behalf of Michigan Department of Community Health)
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Archive_2_307580_7.zip


January 7, 2010

STATE BOARD TO DEVELOP BI-PARTISAN EDUCATION FINANCE REFORM RECOMMENDATION IN 2010

LANSING – The State Board of Education will kick off at its Tuesday, January 12 meeting a process of crafting recommendations for long-term structural reforms to enable Michigan to support effective education systems.

“With looming budget shortfalls for next year, and the need for the state to resolve the education financing problems of Michigan, there is great urgency to develop significant and responsible long-term structural remedies,” said State Board of Education President Kathleen N. Straus.

“Over the months ahead, the State Board plans to publically hear from experts with ideas for meaningful reform, and fulfill our Constitutional responsibility to provide leadership and general supervision over all public education, and advise the Legislature as to the financial requirements,” she added.

At its January 12 meeting the SBE proposes to conduct a series of deliberative forums and policy review sessions in order to develop a set of bi-partisan recommendations to the Governor, state Legislature, and education stakeholders for education funding reform.

“We have seen too much partisanship in education as the Governor and Legislature have dealt with the budget crisis of the past several years,” said Carolyn Curtin, Secretary of the State Board. “One way the State Board can make a significant contribution is by  demonstrating how our educational challenges can be met in a bi-partisan manner.”

State Superintendent Mike Flanagan is encouraged by this dialogue regarding school funding. “By bringing a broad cross-section of views and expertise into an open discussion, we are setting aside long-held divisions and obstacles to dynamic reforms,” he said.

The January 12 meeting will build on State Board discussions begun last year with leading economists and policy analysts. At this meeting, the Board will hear from Jeffrey Guilfoyle, President, Citizens Research Council (CRC) of Michigan, regarding the current education budget situation, and CRC’s research to inform policy.


January 7, 2010

Subject: MDE Education Conncetion Newsletter

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

Here is the latest issue of the MDE Education Connection Newsletter.  Please enjoy and share with colleagues!!! 

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/1-7-10_306604_7.pdf


Teacher Network Leader Receives Beardmore Service To Education Award

January 4, 2010 LANSING – David Borth, chair of the Network of Michigan Educators, has been presented with the State Board of Education’s Dorothy Beardmore Service To Education Award.

Borth, of Big Rapids, also is the Director of the Hawthorn Learning Center, adjunct professor at Ferris State University, and former administrator for Big Rapids Public Schools.

The award is named after the late Dorothy Beardmore, past President and member of the State Board of Education from 1985-2001. It is given to the person whose efforts on behalf of education and education reform are deemed to be of outstanding benefit to the quality of education for all Michigan students.

"David has spent a lifetime volunteering, is an outstanding Big Rapids community member who is well respected and continues through his service to make a great impact on education for the children, youth, and families of Big Rapids and Mecosta and Osceola Counties," said State Board of Education President Kathleen N. Straus.

"David works within a personal philosophy which focuses on making the world a better place," Staus added. "Through this career in education, leadership in change, contributions to involvement, and volunteerism, he is constantly improving the world with which he interacts."

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan expressed thanks to Borth for his work with the Network of Michigan Educators. "David provides great leadership to this collection of the elite educators in the state," Flanagan said. "We count on his experience and input when discussing education policy in Michigan."

Borth is renowned for his 52-year history of educational leadership, service, and humanitarianism. Prior to retiring from the Big Rapids Public Schools, he demonstrated leadership in educational policy development that positively changed the culture for all students in Big Rapids.

"I am deeply honored to receive this award," Borth said. "An award like this is never the end but a new beginning. With the increased credibility comes greater responsibility to serve the cause for which it was bestowed. I intend to respond as best I am able to the many challenges that lie ahead for public education."

Borth has made significant contributions to educational improvement and set a standard for volunteerism and community service, Straus noted. His volunteer interests range from integrating school and community initiatives, preventing violence, assisting families as they gain self-sufficiency, and promoting school readiness to serving as Mecosta County Hospital Foundation Board President.

Borth received the National Educator Award from the Milken Family Foundation in 1995. He also was named the National Distinguished Principal by the National Association of Elementary School Principals in 1994, and the Michigan Principal of the Year in 1993. Since 2003, Borth has chaired Michigan’s Network of Michigan Educators, a consortium of award-winning educators throughout Michigan.

# # #

Dorothy Beardmore promoted educational reform throughout her tenure on the State Board of Education, beginning with formulating new teacher certification rules in 1985 that require focused, relevant professional development for teachers. She envisioned quality education for all students. She dedicated over 34 years of her life to achieving this vision; striving to identify and remove barriers to student achievement; setting high expectations for all; believing that every child is capable of learning; and encouraging others to recognize that every child is capable of learning.

Prior to her election to the State Board of Education, Mrs. Beardmore served eight years on the Rochester Board of Education (1967-75) and 10 years on the Board of Education of Oakland Schools (1974-84).


December 14, 2009

Grant Opportunities for Early Childhood Education and Family Services

The Michigan Department of Education is pleased to announce two Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) competitive grant opportunities. The goal of Part C of the IDEA is to provide support to infants and toddlers under three years of age with disabilities and their families. These funds are geared toward improving the developmental outcomes of children who have disabilities and their family’s capacity to enhance their growth and development. Various stakeholders are eligible to apply including school districts, public or private profit or nonprofit organizations, or institutions of higher learning.

Innovative Intermediate School District

This is a competitive grant opportunity for two or more Intermediate School Districts (ISDs), partnering together to successfully develop a model to coordinate early intervention administrative functions across ISDs.

Family Navigator

Funds will be granted to develop a training module for parents to become Family Navigators. The Family Navigator would serve as a service coordinator/liaison for families of children in the early intervention system. The Family Navigator grant will identify opportunities for improved, sustainable efficiency while still providing the needed services to Part C eligible children and their families.

Grant instructions and application forms are posted on line at www.michigan.gov/earlyon. Additional questions regarding the Part C of the IDEA grants may be directed to Barb Schinderle, Michigan Department of Education, 517-241-2591, or schinderleb@michigan.gov.


Library of Michigan's 2010 Michigan Notable Books Reflect Our State’s Legacy of Perseverance

December 10, 2009

LANSING - The Library of Michigan today announced the list of the 2010 Michigan Notable Books – 20 books highlighting Michigan people, places, and events.

“This year’s selections prove that persevering through economic and personal hardship is nothing new for Michiganians, and that this enduring and independent spirit has a long, rich history in the Great Lakes State,” said state Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan.

Short stories of despairing people moving toward salvation; a biography of the state’s first geologist, who discovered many of Michigan’s natural treasures; and a children’s book that tells the story of a slave family’s flight to freedom are among this year’s most notable Michigan books.

“This year’s Michigan Notable Books bring to life the Michigan experience through vivid storytelling that creates portraits of the people and places that make Michigan great,” said State Librarian Nancy Robertson. “Addressing Michigan’s natural beauty, its innovative leaders or the faith of its people, these books celebrate Michigan as a place and a people that even in the most trying of times find transformation. The Library of Michigan is delighted to honor these 20 books as the 2010 Michigan Notable Books.”

Each year the Michigan Notable Books (MNB) list features 20 books published in the previous calendar year that are about, or set in, Michigan or the Great Lakes region, or are written by a Michigan author. Selections include nonfiction and fiction books that appeal to a variety of audiences and cover a range of topics and issues close to the hearts of Michigan residents.

Michigan Notable Books is a statewide program that began as part of the 1991 Michigan Week celebration, geared to pay tribute and draw attention to the many people, places and things that make Michigan life unique. In that regard, MNB successfully highlights Michigan books and writers focusing on the Great Lakes State. Each title on the 2010 list gives readers insight into what it means to make your home in Michigan and proves some of the greatest stories are indeed found in the Great Lakes region.

This year's Michigan Notable Book selection committee includes representatives from the Library of Michigan; Borders Inc.; Cooley Law School; The Detroit News; Detroit Public Library; Grand Valley State University; Lansing City Pulse; Michigan Center for the Book; Michigan Historical Center; Schuler Books & Music; and the Traverse City Record Eagle.

The Library of Michigan museum store will carry the 2010 Michigan Notable Books and the books will also be available at the Michigan e-store at http://apps.michigan.gov/MichiganeStore/public/Home.aspx.

For more information about the MNB program, call 517 373-1300, visit www.michigan.gov/notablebooks or e-mail michigannotablebooks@michigan.gov.


December 3, 2009

SUBJECT: On-Site Review for National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, and Afterschool Snack Program

National School Lunch Program (NSLP) Regulations 7 CFR 210.8 (a) (1) require that a School Food Authority (SFA), with more than one building, must conduct an on-site review in each building annuallybefore February 1. Additionally each Afterschool Snack Program must be reviewed by the SFA two times per year [7 CFR 210.9 (c) (7)].

The on-site review requires the following assessment:

National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP):

  • Application Approval/Direct Certification/Master Roster
  • Meal Count Systems
  • Edit Checks
  • Meal Planning and Food Production

Afterschool Snack Program:

  • Area Eligibility Meal Count System 
  • Non-Area Eligibility Meal Count System 
  • General Operations 
  • Meal Patterns/Food Production

More specific details for the items listed above and the on-site review forms are included in Food Service Administrative Policy No. 9, School Year 2009-2010 – On-Site Review – National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, and Afterschool Snack Program, available at

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/9_On-Site_Review_301936_7.doc.

Questions regarding the On-Site Review of the NSLP, SBP, and Afterschool Snack Program should be directed to the School Nutrition Training and Programs unit at MDE-schoolnutrition@michigan.gov or 517-373-3347.


November 30, 2009

SUBJECT: Teacher Professional Development Time

This is to advise that the new language in Section 101(10) of the State School Aid Act which requires local districts and public school academies to provide 5 online hours of professional development in order to count up to 38 hours of professional development towards the minimum requirement of 1,098 hours of instruction is not effective until the school year 2010-2011. Although the language of the act indicates that it is effective for the 2009-2010 (current) fiscal year, the Department has received confirmation from the legislature that their intent is to have the requirement effective with the 2010-2011 year. To reiterate, districts will be able to count up to 38 hours of professional development in lieu of instruction for the 2009-2010 school year even if none of the hours were provided online. Districts will not be able to count any professional development hours in lieu of instruction for the 2010-2011 school year unless at least 5 of the hours are provided online.

All other requirements of Section 101 related to professional development, including that the professional development meets at least one of the criteria below, must also be met in order for the time to be counted in lieu of instruction.

(a) Achieving or improving adequate yearly progress as defined under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, Public Law 107-110.

(b) Achieving accreditation or improving a school’s accreditation status under Section 1280 of the Revised School Code, MCL 380.1280.

(c) Achieving highly qualified teacher status as defined under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, Public Law 107-110.

(d) Maintaining teacher certification.

Also, the law stipulates that to be counted the online professional development must originate from the Michigan Virtual University or another Department-approved intermediate school district (ISD). All ISDs are currently approved by the Department to provide this professional development. Guidelines related to the online professional development will be sent under a separate cover.

If you have any questions regarding counting professional development time as instruction, please fee free to contact Joellen Wonsey at WonseyJ@Michigan.gov or (517) 373-3350. Other questions pertaining to professional development should be directed to Donna Hamilton at HamiltonD3@Michigan.gov or (517) 241-4544.


November 17, 2009

SUBJECT: Notification of State-Imposed Rules

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires each state that receives funds under the IDEA to identify, in writing, to local educational agencies located in the state any such rule, regulation, or policy as a state-imposed requirement that is not required by the IDEA and federal regulations (20 U.S.C. 1407(a); 34 CFR §300.199). The following are Michigan’s state-imposed requirements:

 

Michigan Provides Programs and Services Birth to Age 26
R 340.1702
R 340.1711(1)
R 340.1733(b)-(e)
R 340.1754(a)
R 340.1755(a)
§380.1711(1)(f)

Michigan Has Established Specific Timelines
R 340.1721(1)
R 340.1722(a)(1)-(3)
R 340.1722e(b)
R 340.1723c(2)
R 340.1746(a)
R 340.1757(a)

Caseload and Class Size Limits
R340.1733(j)
R 340.1738(a)
R 340.1739 – R 340.1749c
R 340.1754(c)
R 340.1756 – R 340.1758

Required Multidisciplinary Evaluation Team Members
R 340.1705 – R 340.1710
R 340.1713(7)(b)
R 340.1715 – R 340.1717
R 340.1721a(1)(2)

Specific Minimum Standards for Program Length
R 340.1738(b)
R 340.1748(2)
R 340.1754(b)
R 340.1755(b)  

Short-term Objectives and Extended School Year Services
R 340.1721e(2)(b)(d)(3)

Parent Advisory Committee
R 340.1838

Specific Information Given to Parents
R 340.1723c(1)(c)(d)

Intermediate School District Plans
R 340.1831 – R 340.1837
Auxiliary Services
R 340.291 – R 340.295

If you have any questions, please contact Ms. Ann Omans, Supervisor, Program Accountability, Office of Special Education and Early Intervention Services, at (517) 373-0924, or via email at omansa@michigan.gov.


Project ReImagine Districts Announced to Help Lead Education Reform Efforts in Michigan

November 12, 2009

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan announced today the selection of 13 Project ReImagine demonstration districts to begin innovative strategies using public and private partnerships to help change the way education is delivered to Michigan school children.

Flanagan issued a challenge to Michigan’s public schools this summer to boldly and dramatically reimagine their systems to ensure all students learn and achieve at high levels. Three of the 13 proposals are intermediate school districts (ISDs), which brings the total number of districts involved in Project ReImagine to 52. A total of 71 proposals were submitted to the Michigan Department of Education.

"We are excited that so many districts worked collaboratively with community partners to reimagine education and propose system-wide reform," Flanagan said. "These are incubators of reform that push the current limits and eventually can be replicated in schools across Michigan."

Flanagan explained that these districts now are eligible to be included in Michigan’s Race to the Top application, providing them with a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to use federal economic recovery funds to support dramatic change to prepare Michigan’s children for college and the 21st Century global economy.

Flanagan encourages all of the districts that submitted proposals to be committed to going forward with their Project ReImagine plans regardless of the additional federal funding. "Getting Race to the Top will be icing on the cake," he added.

The demonstration districts are: Armada, Battle Creek Lakeview, Comstock, Detroit, Farwell, Grand Rapids, N.I.C.E. Community Schools in Ishpeming, Oxford, Utica, University Preparatory Academy in Detroit, Mason-Lake ISD, Saginaw ISD, and Traverse Bay Area ISD.

"Project ReImagine is driving grass-roots education reform in Michigan," said State Board of Education President Kathleen N. Straus. "These are ideas that have been developed at the local school level and reflect a real cross-section of school districts and student populations – urban, rural, and suburban."

Key initiatives in the proposals include: language immersion at the elementary level; reforming teacher assignment processes and compensation packages; project-based learning; early/middle college; from seat time to performance; flexible calendar and flexible grouping of students; multiple pathways to a diploma; early childhood; and regionalizing food service, business, transportation, operations and maintenance, human resources, and administrative services.


October 27, 2009

Subject: Mandatory Expulsion Laws

FROM: Mike Flanagan, Superintendent of Public Instruction

While the reluctance to expel a student for at least 180 days for a mandatory expulsion offense might be understandable, it violates the letter and spirit of the law that would allow a student to simply dropout or disenroll. A district must follow the procedures established in law, giving that student an alternative opportunity to continue his/her education.

MCL 380.1311 states, "If a pupil possesses in a weapon free school zone a weapon that constitutes a dangerous weapon, commits arson in a school building or on school grounds, or commits criminal sexual conduct in a school building or on school grounds, the school board… shall expel the pupil from the school district permanently, subject to possible reinstatement…"

MCL 380.1311a states, "If a pupil… commits a physical assault at school against a person employed by or engaged as a volunteer or contractor by the school board… then the school board… shall expel the pupil from the school district permanently, subject to possible reinstatement…"

With great advancements in technology, specifically online learning opportunities, the actual interruption to a student’s educational progress can be minimal. Any student expelled under the above laws could fall under the "seat-time waiver" option. Fifty-four intermediate school districts already have signed up under the Genesee ISD seat time waiver program that allows 25% of students in a building, but not more than 10% of students in the ISD region, to take all of their education classes online.

Districts are obligated to follow the mandates of the law and should take great care in adhering to the procedures outlined in the law, knowing that students do have options for continuing their education. The Michigan Department of Education strongly encourages districts to work with students and families affected by this law

to identify alternative educational opportunities. If you have questions about the Genesee program, please contact Beverly Knox-Pipes, Assistant Superintendent at stwinfo@geneseeisd.org.


October 26, 2009

MICHIGAN STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RESOLUTION
Funding of PreK-12 and Higher Education

WHEREAS, given the demonstrated importance of investments in education to Michigan's economic future, and the imperative to combine needed investments in preK-12 and higher education with meaningful, money-saving reforms in the organization and delivery of education; and

WHEREAS, the long-term economic health of our state, and opportunity for our citizens is conditioned on meaningful structural reform of both the revenue and expenditure sides of education; and

WHEREAS, given the crippling effects on our citizens and our educational institutions of continuing short-term, temporary, stop-gap measures and budget impasses over education funding; now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED, That the State Board of Education will join the Governor, Legislature, school districts, and other stakeholders in the coming months to develop a long-term structural remedy to enable the state’s investment in education and its people; and be it further

RESOLVED, That along with the State Board of Education and Department of Education, school districts continue to reimagine the preK-12 educational system in Michigan that will lead to the Board’s expectations for student achievement; and be it further

RESOLVED, That the State Board of Education encourages school districts to work with the Michigan State Board of Education and Department of Education to consolidate services and schools that lead to a more equitable, more efficient, more affordable, and more sustainable system of public education; and be it finally

RESOLVED, That the State Board of Education encourages the Governor and Legislature to immediately find the revenues necessary to reduce the cuts to the educational budget to meet their Constitutional responsibility.

Adopted October 26, 2009


October 23, 2009

Subject: Grant Award Notification for FY 2009-2010 Early On Formula allocation Grants for
the ARRA Funds Under the IDEA, Part C

This memorandum provides notice of the Final ARRA grant award to the Intermediate School Districts
(ISDs) under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Part C, Early On. The Office of
Early Childhood Education and Family Services prepared a list, Exhibit A, which details final ARRA
grant awards.

This notice includes the second half of the ARRA funding with the original 50 percent previously
awarded at the end of June.

An award packet will be available in the Michigan Electronic Grants System (MEGS) once the final
ARRA IDEA Early On application is apporved.

If you have any questions reguarding this notification, please contact the Office of Early Childhood
Education and Family Services at (517) 373-8483.


Curtis Granderson’s Book All You Can Be Donated to All Public Elementary School Libraries

October 21, 2009

LANSING – All public elementary school libraries in Michigan soon will be receiving a copy of Detroit
Tigers’ Curtis Granderson’s new book. Granderson and publisher Triumph Books are proud to donate
a copy of Granderson’s book All You Can Be to every public elementary school library in Michigan.
The illustrations in this book were contributed by fourth grade students from across Michigan.

Earlier this year, with the help from the Michigan Department of Education, the Grand Kids Foundation
and Triumph Books held a contest inviting fourth graders across the state to submit their artwork
through their school for consideration to be included in the book. The theme for the artwork was:
How do you see yourself when you are in high school and how is education important in helping you
become that person?
There were hundreds of submissions and Granderson chose 29 of them to be
in his book. Those students whose artwork was chosen received a free copy of the book,
autographed by Granderson.

"Our many fine teachers throughout the state, along with other educators and administrators, are
always looking for new and refreshing ways to motivate students and create enthusiasm for the joy
of learning," said state Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan. "All You Can Be takes a
unique approach to student involvement in this adventure by giving them the opportunity to create t
heir own artwork, illustrating the importance that education plays in achieving their goals for the future.

"I’d like to thank Curtis for his generosity not only to school libraries, but for his overall commitment to
education," Flanagan said.

With special input from the Michigan Department of Education, Granderson and his mother, Mary
Granderson (herself, a retired school teacher), All You Can Be is the latest effort from Triumph Books
to help children get excited about learning - in this case helping them realize that the things they are
taught every day have very real applications later in life.

"There was one simple thing I wanted to achieve with All You Can Be – to make learning fun for school
children," said Granderson. "My mother, Mary, co-author, Terry Foster, and I truly feel we have
accomplished what we set out to do, which was to make learning fun through using creative and
different ways to get Michigan’s elementary school students thinking about their future."

Granderson grew up on the south side of Chicago. He loved sports and was determined to become a
successful athlete. But perhaps because both of his parents were teachers, he had an even stronger
desire to succeed in the classroom. He loved learning for its own sake, and from an early age the
importance of education. Now an established Major League baseball All-Star, Granderson has not
forgotten the lessons he learned growing up. These are lessons not only about the importance of
education, but also about working hard to attain goals; and lessons about character, integrity, and
personal responsibility.

All of the net proceeds from the public sale of the books will go to Granderson’s foundation: Grand Kids
Foundation, whose funds go towards purchasing school supplies for needy families/kids; books and
supplies for schools that do not get the funding they always need; establishing baseball programs as
well as providing equipment and facilities in some of Michigan’s inner cities; and eventually a scholarship
program for graduating high school seniors.


October 21, 2009

Procedural Safeguards Notice Available in Arabic & Spanish

The Procedural Safeguards Notice document is now available in Arabic and Spanish on the MDE, OSE-EIS Web site. To access the documents, go tohttp://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,1607,7-140-6530_6598_36168---,00.html and select the "Other Languages" link under Procedural Safeguards Notice.

Lori Schulze
Michigan Department of Education
Office of Special Education and Early Intervention Services
(517) 335-0458
www.michigan.gov/ose-eis


October 20, 2009

SUBJECT: Educational Development Plans

P.A. 141 of 2007 requires districts to provide students an opportunity to develop an Educational Development Plan (EDP). Specifically, the law states:

"The board of a school district or board of directors of a public school academy shall ensure that each pupil in Grade 7 is provided with the oppoftunity to develop an educational development plan, and that each pupil has developed an educational development plan before he or she begins high school. An educational development plan shall be developed by the pupil under the supervision of the pupil's school counselor or designee qualified and selected by the high school principal and shall be based on a career pathways program or similar career Utilization of the principles approved by the Michigan State Board of Education for Universal Design for Learning Review and endorsement by a parent The Educational Development Plan supports the Michigan Merit requirements for all students and the document, EDP Fundamentals, is available on the MDE website (www.michiqan.aovfmde). A sample EDP is available at: http://media.mivu,ors/mvu/examoleedo.odf. exploration program."

In response to district requests for assistance with the Educational Development Plan, the Michigan Department of education has developed a set of guidelines, which recommends all EDPs include the following:

  • Personal information
  • Career goals
  • Student's grade level
  • Student identified career goals
  • Assessment results (academic and career)
  • Educational/training goals
  • A plan of action that identifies a broad career pathway
  • Course selections for high school that support student's goals/interests
  • Information on options to meet the state graduation requirements including postsecondary enrollment options
  • Long-term goals and planning to support postsecondary/post-school options
  • Information on resources and other learning experiences that support the achievement of student goals

    Utilization of the principles approved by the Michigan State Board of Education for Universal Design for Learning Review and endorsement by a parent The Educational Development Plan supports the Michigan Merit requirements for all students and the document, EDP Fundamentals,is available on the MDE website (www.michiqan.aovfmde). A sample EDP is available at: http://media.mivu,ors/mvu/examole edo.odf.


October 16, 2009

AMENDED GRANT AWARD NOTIFICATION

MEMORANDUM

TO: Intermediate School District Superintendents, Directors of Special Education and the Michigan School for the Deaf Chief Administrator

FROM: Mike Flanagan

Superintendent of Public Instruction

SUBJECT: Grant Award Notification of Final FY 2009-2010 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Funds Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Part B, Section 619, Special Education Preschool

This memorandum provides notice of the Final ARRA grant award to the Intermediate School Districts (ISDs) under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Part B, Section 619, and Special Education Preschool. The Office of Early Childhood Education and Family Services prepared the enclosed list, Exhibit A, which details the final ARRA grant awards.

This includes the second half of the ARRA funding with the original 50 percent previously awarded at the end of June.

An award packet will be available in the Michigan Electronic Grants System (MEGS) once the final ARRA IDEA Special Education Preschool application is approved.

If you have any questions regarding this notification, please contact the Office of Early Childhood Education and Family Services at (517) 373-8483.


October 16, 2009

FFROM: Carol Wolenberg, Deputy Superintendent

SUBJECT: ARRA – Investing in Innovation (i3) Fund

The U.S. Department of Education recently announced the proposed requirements for the Investing in Innovation (i3) Fund under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). On October 9, 2009, the proposed requirements were published in the Federal Register for public comment and are available at www.regulations.gov. Public comment is due on or before November 9, 2009. It is anticipated that the final notice will be released in late winter or early spring 2010.

The i3 funding will provide approximately $650 million for competitive grants to individual local education agencies (LEAs) or groups of LEAs working in collaboration with one another. Nonprofit organizations, colleges and universities also can join with school districts to submit applications. The purpose of the program is to provide competitive grants that expand the implementation of, and investment in, innovative and evidence-based practices, programs and strategies that significantly demonstrate their previous success in closing achievement gaps; increasing graduation rates; or recruiting and retaining high-quality teachers and principals. Applications are submitted directly to the U.S. Department of Education.

Under the proposed priorities, grants would be awarded in three categories:

  • Scale-up Grants: The largest possible grant category is focused on programs and practices with the potential to reach hundreds of thousands of students. Applicants must have a strong base of evidence that their program has had a significant effect on improving student achievement.
  • Validation Grants: Existing, promising programs that have good evidence of their impact and are ready to improve their evidence base while expanding in their own and other communities.
  • Development Grants: Designed to support new and high potential practices whose impact should be studied further.

Grant recipients will be required to match federal funds with private or public dollars. Successful applicants will need to demonstrate how their programs will be sustainable after their federal grants are completed.

Additional information is available at www.ed.gov/recovery.


October 16, 2009

FROM: Carol Wolenberg, Deputy Superintendent

SUBJECT: Summer Food Service Program During a H1N1-Related School Closure

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) memorandum dated July 23, 2009, outlines how schools and community organizations may obtain authorization from their states to utilize the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) to provide reimbursable meals to low-income children during school closures related to the H1N1 influenza virus.

USDA has added flexibility using program waiver authority in an effort to address concerns regarding the loss of school meals for low-income children. As a result, the Michigan Department of Education has developed Food Service Administrative Policy No. 5 – Summer Food Service Program During a H1N1-Related School Closure that explains the requirements for School Food Authorities (SFA) and Community Organizations (CO) that may decide to serve meals under the SFSP during a H1N1-related school closure. A copy of the policy is available at

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/No._5_SFSP_During_a_H1N1-Related_Sch_Closure_296303_7.doc.

Questions regarding this memo may be directed to the Grants Coordination and School Support, School Nutrition Training and Programs unit by email to MDE-schoolnutrition@michigan.gov or phone 517-373-3347.


October 14, 2009

Competitive Bid Threshold - FY 2010

The purpose of this letter is to communicate changes to the base amount above which competitive bids must be obtained for remodeling, procurement of supplies, materials, and equipment. Sections 623a, 1267, and 1274 of the Revised School Code establish a base above which competitive bids must be obtained and provide for an increase in the base that corresponds with increases in the Consumer Price Index. The fiscal year 2009-2010 base for Section 1267, pertaining to construction, renovation, repair, or remodeling and the new base for Sections 623a and 1274, pertaining to procurement of supplies, materials, and equipment, is $20,998.

Our analysis shows that the average Consumer Price Index (CPI) for the 12 month period ending August 31, 2008 was 213.61. The similar average for the 12 months ending August 31, 2009 was 214.00, a percentage increase of 0.19%. The fiscal year 2008-2009 base of $20,959 for Section 1267 items has increased by $39 to $20,998. The base of $20,488 for Sections 623a and 1274 items increases by $510 to $20,998. While the increase to the Sections 623a and 1274 threshold is due in part to the CPI increase, it is also results from the Michigan Legislature acting to synchronize the pertinent sections of the Revised School Code for the sake of simplicity.

Section 620(1) of the Revised School Code [MCL 380.620(1)] establishes a base above which travel expenses paid with intermediate funds must be posted to the ISD website. Section 620(1) provides for an increase in the base that corresponds with increases in the Consumer Price Index. For fiscal year 2009-10, the new base amount for travel is $3,434 (3,428 x 1.0019).

There are changes to the limits on the value of awards given by an ISD to an employee, volunteer, or pupil, as well as the value above which an ISD administrator may not accept a gift from a vendor or potential vendor. Section 634 places an upper limit on the value of awards given by an ISD to an employee, volunteer, or pupil, as well as the value above which an ISD administrator may not accept a gift from a vendor or potential vendor. The fiscal year 2008-09 cap of $116 for awards and the cap of $51 for gifts did not increase, due to the relatively low percentage increase in the average CPI.

Please note that all of the thresholds and caps mentioned in this communication are effective as of this date, and are in effect until the next communication revises them.

If you have any questions, please contact Phil Boone, Office of State Aid and School Finance, at (517) 335-4059 or boonep2@michigan.gov.


October 2, 2009

SUBJECT: One-Year Delay of Implementation of the Michigan School Accreditation System (MI-SAS)

It had been anticipated that the new Michigan School Accreditation System

(MI-SAS) would have final legislative approval in time to implement MI-SAS for the 2009-2010 school year. However, because of the focus the House and Senate have had to put toward resolving Michigan’s budget, approval has not yet been received.

Because significant lead time is required for defining and building the new system before it can be implemented, it is now too late to have the development complete in time for the 2009-2010 school year.

Therefore, we will continue to pursue legislative approval in order to implement

MI-SAS for the first time in the 2010-2011 school year. In the interim, the existing school accreditation system (Education YES!) will be continued for the 2009-2010 school year. The school self-reports will continue to be completed as they were last year. An announcement will soon be coming of the opening of the website for completing the school self-reports.

If you have any questions, please contact the Office of Educational Assessment and Accountability at oeaa@michigan.gov.


September 29, 2009

SUBJECT: Migrant Student Information Exchange (MSIX), Migrant Education Data System (MEDS), and Michigan Student Data System (MSDS) Interaction

The U.S. Department of Education has created a national data system (MSIX) to help states place migrant students into their correct grade and classes within your school system. To achieve this goal, Michigan worked diligently to get the educational systems to talk to each other. Thanks to the staff in Center for Educational Performance and Information (CEPI), the new MSDS will now talk with the state migrant data system (MEDS) to collect information for individual students on their curriculum, grades, credit hours, and assessment scores.

As the U.S. Department of Education has put a time constraint on when the data has to be uploaded to MSIX, MSDS will have a to-do list that will pop up using data from MEDS to inform the data entry person that there are components of the student’s record that must be entered within ten (10) days of the to-do list date. This data will then be transferred to MSIX through MEDS on a nightly basis.

We are requesting that all data entry personnel be made aware of this information so as to keep Michigan in compliance with the federal requirements for MSIX. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Evelyn Sitterson at sittersone@michigan.gov or at 517-335-0352.


September 16, 2009

SUBJECT: Michigan Profile for Healthy Youth Survey

The Michigan Profile for Healthy Youth (MiPHY) 2010 survey cycle opens on September 1, 2009, and continues through May 31, 2010. The Michigan Profile for Healthy Youth is an online student survey available every other year to all Michigan schools with grades 7, 9, and 11. The MiPHY provides student health behavior and risk and protective factor data for school-based, data-driven decision making.

Districts can register on the system at anytime during the open cycle at www.michigan.gov/miphyadmin. The survey system and reports, developed by the Michigan Departments of Education and Community Health, are provided at no cost to schools. Online reports accessed through the MiPHY administration website inform local efforts to reduce drug use, violence, and related problem behaviors, and to promote healthy youth development.

The MiPHY:

  • is endorsed by MDE and MDCH as the recommended survey for local assessment of student risk behaviors.
  • reduces the burden of conducting multiple student surveys. The MiPHY measures all key student health behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes.
  • is free of charge to districts. The no-cost survey system and reports allow more Title IV, Part A, Safe and Drug-Free Schools’ funds for direct services.
  • is private. Student privacy is maintained through confidential, anonymous, and voluntary participation.
  • is designed for local use and local-level decision making. Reports are intended for use by districts and their community partners, with electronic access limited to personnel approved by the district superintendent or public school academy director.
  • generates reports quickly. Buildings and districts can access results 2-4 business days after closing the survey, allowing time to identify needs and plan for adjustments in services.
  • will provide trend reports from year-to-year and comparisons to the Michigan Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS).


    For more information about the MiPHY, please visit www.michigan.gov/miphy or contact:
    Nicole Kramer
    Project Specialist
    E-mail: kramern@michigan.gov
    Phone
    : 517-373-4354

Tuesday September 8, 2009

SUBJECT: Recognizing Excellent Educators

The State Board of Education and I would like to take this opportunity to wish you much success in the 2009-2010 school year. We appreciate all that you do each and every day to provide a positive learning environment for all of Michigan’s children.

Research demonstrates that the quality of the teacher is the most important in-school factor that explains student achievement. We would like your help in identifying excellence in teaching.  The programs are:

Please forward the flyer to members of your local school board, parent leaders, union leadership, school principals, human resource directors, and others who would be able to identify outstanding educators.

The Department also collaborates with the Milken Family Foundation on its National Educator Award process. There is no nomination or application procedure for this award. Information on the Milken Family Foundation can be accessed at www.mff.org.

The State Board of Education and I encourage you to participate in these programs. Recognizing the great contributions educators make to the learning community and to our children takes very little time and helps to boost the morale of these essential employees.

We would also appreciate it if you could link the Department Recognition Programs to your website using www.michigan.gov/trp. Questions regarding these programs may be directed to Ms. Jean M. Shane at shanej@michigan.gov.

To assist all of us in getting the information about these recognition programs out to schools across the state, the information on the flyer will be printed in the form of postcards and personally distributed by MEEMIC agents. MEEMIC Insurance Company has contributed the design, print and distribution costs for both the flyer and the postcards. We are grateful to MEEMIC Insurance Company for their financial support of these initiatives and for providing corporate support to the Michigan Teacher of the Year program. For more information about MEEMIC Insurance Company, please visit www.meemic.com.

Thank you again for your commitment to the children and the future of Michigan. I am grateful.


August 30, 2009

SUBJECT: Release of Embargoed Statewide Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Data and Transition of AYP Status Identification

Release of Embargoed Statewide AYP Data

In compliance with Federal Title I, Part A, legislation identified schools are required to notify the parents of all enrolled students annually of the school’s Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) status, prior to the beginning of the school year. In addition, this notification requires school districts to compare their AYP information to the State average and to other schools in the district.

Beyond these requirements, identified schools which receive Title I funds must notify parents of all enrolled students of the option to transfer their children to a non-identified school in their district. A listing of these non-identified schools must also be provided.

In order to facilitate this process, the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) is providing school districts with statewide AYP data prior to the public release scheduled for Thursday, September 3, 2009, with the understanding that this information is embargoed and for internal use only. This information is not to be disseminated or shared with anyone outside your school district.

Transition of AYP Status Identification

This year, MDE will begin transitioning from the use of various "phases" to describe school AYP status to the three "stages" outlined in the Federal Title I, Part A, legislation commonly used by other states. These stages will designate schools as "Identified for School Improvement," "Identified for Corrective Action," and "Identified for Restructuring." Identified schools are categorized into one of these groups depending upon the number of years the school has not met AYP.

To provide a smooth transition, MDE will be placing both phase and stage information on AYP and Report Card data and documents. The change will be finalized for the beginning of the 2010-11 school year.

A comparison of current AYP phases and new Title I, Part A, stages is provided below:

Years AYP Not Met

Current Phases

2

Phase 1

3

Phase 2

4

Phase 3

5 or more years

Phase 4 and above

Thank you for all you and your staff are doing to serve Michigan students. Questions concerning the identification status transition can be directed to Mike Radke in the Office of Field Services at 517-373-3921 or by e-mail at radkem@michigan.gov. Questions concerning AYP status can be directed to Paul Bielawski in the Office of Educational Assessment and Accountability at 517-335-5784 or by e-mail at bielawskip@michigan.gov.


August 25, 2009

Subject: Fall 2009 Updated H1N1 Guidance

Currently, the State of Michigan is preparing for a resurgence of the 2009 novel influenza A (H1N1) virus. We have been able to learn much from our experience with this virus during the first wave of this influenza pandemic in schools and local health department jurisdictions. While planning and preparations are continuing, our knowledge about this virus continues to evolve daily, and we would like to bring several issues to your attention as we prepare for the new school year and the increase in influenza activity, both seasonal and pandemic, that will occur.

The H1N1 virus has been shown to affect school-aged children disproportionately, and children are known to be highly likely to transmit flu viruses, especially in school and other congregate settings. All of us need to do what we can to keep students engaged in the learning process, and to maintain a sense of normalcy. During the fall influenza season, we also need to be prepared and ready.

We strongly recommend that schools and school districts work closely with local health departments early in the planning process, and partner with them to report influenza activity, absenteeism, and potential school dismissals; to implement recommended interventions; and to educate students and the community. Schools and state health departments should ensure that continuity of operations plans are in place and updated to reflect the potential impact of pandemic influenza upon staff levels and/or students absenteeism. Other recommendations for schools and public health include:

  • Schools and health departments should begin planning for seasonal or pandemic vaccination programs, either on or off-site, specifically targeted to protect the young and/or at-risk schools-aged children and staff.
  • The federal Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), working with the United States Departments of Education (USED), released several documents toi assist educators and public health officials in decision-making reguarding a potential school dismissal due to H1N1 influenza: "Guidance for State and Local Health Officials and School Administrators for the School Responses to Flu during 2009-2010 School Year," and a "Technical Report for State Responses to Flu during 2009-2010 School Year." These documents provide different guidance from those implemented this spring, and we recommend that these be reviewed closely. These documents are available at: http://www.cdc.gov.h1n1flu/schools/.
  • For the first time, the federal governement will be implementing a national school dismissal reporting system in order to track the impact of the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is requesting, by 10:00 a.m. each day, schools or schools districts report if they are dismissed due to the H1N1 activity during the 2009-2010 school year. School districts and local public health agencies may complete this form via web (www.cdc.gov/FluSchoolDismissal), e-mail FluSchoolDismissal@cdc.gov), or fax (770-488-6156). Further information can be found at: http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/schools/dismissalform/.
  • Examine exsisting contracts for any employee issues or stipulations if school is dismissed, or is staff are asked to stay home if they are ill.
  • With regard to education requirements, make school curriculum plans adaptable and flexible; waivers from the required hours of instruction are not currently anticipated. If a school requires dismissal due to heavy influenza activity or student absenteeism, the remaining school-year calendar may be impacted.
  • School and health departments, with the assistance of the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) and the Department of Community Health (MDCH), should engage in parental communications now with regard to expectations for the fall.
  • Start educating students, parents, and staff now with regard to preventitive hygiene practices and remaining home if ill.
  • Investigate how your meal programs will be impacted if you have to dismiss a school in your district. United Stated Department of Agriculture (USDA) has posted information as of July 29, 2009 at http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/goverance/Policy-Memos/2009/SP31-2009os.pdf.
  • Encourage seasonal and  novel influenza A (H1N1) vaccination when it becomes available.

Decisions regarding the most appropriate time for school dismissal will always  be difficult, as they may involve school-based factors such as staff or student absenteeism; or public health-based decsions on high levels of school-based virus transmission or community mitigation needs. As such, these decisions are local in nature and could vary from district to district, if not school to school.

DHHD also released a "Preparing for Flu: A Communication Toolkit for Schools (K-12)," also at http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/schools/. Please also visit www.michigan.gov/flu andwww.michigan.gov/mde for state agency and federal information, and the www.flu.gov and www.ed.gov website for federal agency information.

We appreciate all that you have done with regard to the response to the first wave of this novel influenza strain. We look forward to working with you this fall.


July 31, 2009

SUBJECT: Request for Comments on Waivers of ARRA Title I Requirements

The U.S. Department of Education (USED) is allowing States to request the authority to waive certain requirements in the Title I American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) for their local school districts. The Michigan Department of Education (MDE) Office of Field Services (OFS) is moving quickly to request the authority to waive seven of the most time sensitive requirements (see attached) to provide more flexibility in the use of ARRA funds.

The process to request waiver authority is prescribed by the USED and involves the following steps:

  1. Notification to districts and the public of the opportunity to comment on each of the waivers before MDE submits them to the USED. 
  2. Submission of the waiver requests to USED, along with any comments. 
  3. USED approval of the requests, granting MDE the authority to waive each of the seven requirements consistent with Federal guidance.

This memorandum serves as MDE’s notification to districts; MDE is also making the required public announcement available for comments on our website. We encourage you to submit comments using the process attached to this communication, within the next fourteen calendar days.

As soon as MDE is granted the waiver authority, OFS will work with you on submitting requests for your individual district waivers.

Thank you for all you and your staff are doing to serve Michigan students. Questions may be directed to Mike Radke in OFS at 517-373-3921 or by e-mail at radkem@michigan.gov.


July 23, 2009

SUBJECT: Administrative Policy Memoranda on Procurement

As a result of recent United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) memoranda and recent legislation passed in Michigan, procurement procedures for Child Nutrition Programs (CNP) have been modified. The Michigan Department of Education (MDE) has approved two new administrative policy memoranda on procurement.

Administrative Policy Number 6 discusses applying geographic preference in procurements for the Child Nutrition Programs and can be found at http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/admpol6_08-09_286061_7.doc

Administrative Policy Number 7 describes the required threshold for the purchases of food, services, and/or supplies and also provides guidelines and procurement methods applicable to all participants in the Child Nutrition Programs. This policy can be found at http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/admpol7-08-09_286062_7.doc

Questions regarding the content of these policy memoranda may be directed to the Grants Coordination and School Support, Fiscal Management and Food Distribution office at 517-373-8642.


July 23, 2009

SUBJECT: Public School Site Plan Review Authority (Executive Order 2009-33)

Effective August, 10, 2009, Governor Jennifer Granholm transferred authority over approval of school building construction, reconstruction, remodeling and site plans from the Superintendent of Public Instruction to the Bureau of Construction Codes (BCC) within the Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth which already is responsible for enforcement of the Construction of School Buildings Act and the Stille-DeRossett-Hale Single State Construction Code Act, Executive Order 2009-33. The Executive Order takes effect on August 10, 2009. Executive Order 2009-33 is available on the Governor’s website at www.michigan.gov/gov.

Section 380.1263 of the Revised School Code, MCL 380.1263(3), grants the Superintendent of Public Instruction sole and exclusive jurisdiction, subject to the Construction of School Buildings Act, 1937 PA 306, over school district construction and site plans. School districts must still comply with all laws to the extent required by the Construction of School Buildings Act, and the Stille-DeRossett-Hale Single State Construction Code Act, 1972 PA 230. Executive Order 2009-33 transfers this authority to BCC.

Site plan submission and questions relating to site plans should continue to be directed to Mr. Todd Cordill, Chief, Plan Review Division, Bureau of Construction Codes, Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth, Post Office Box 30254, Lansing, Michigan 48909, 517-241-9328 or bccplanreviewcodemail@michigan.gov. You may access additional information regarding school construction at the Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth, Bureau of Construction Codes at www.michigan.gov/bcc.


July 20, 2009

Subject: Bay Mills Community College Request for Proposals for Charter High School

Interested Parties,

Bay Mills Community College (BMCC) has announced that it will accept proposals for a charter high school.  See the details at the BMCC webpage for the Charter Schools Office:  http://www.bmcc.edu/charter_docs/announcements.htm

Greg Olszta
Public School Academy Program
Office of School Improvement
Michigan Department of Education
608 W. Allegan, St. 4th Floor
Lansing Michigan 48909
Phone: 517-241-4715
Fax:     517-241-0247
olsztag@michigan.gov


July 2, 2009

SUBJECT: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Qualified School Construction Bond (ARRA-QSCB) Program

The Michigan Department of Education (MDE) is pleased to announce the availability of a new bond program that may benefit all local and intermediate school districts as well as public school academies. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Qualified School Construction Bond (ARRA-QSCB) Program is a federal program of which public schools can take advantage to finance the construction, rehabilitation, or repair of a public school facility or for the acquisition of land on which a facility is to be constructed on an interest-free basis through the allocation of tax credits. Over $296 million of financing will be issued.

Created by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, ARRA-QSCBs are obligations issued by state or local governments to renovate and improve public schools. These obligations may be used on behalf of schools or programs that meet the following criteria:

  • A district must spend 10 percent of its ARRA-QSCB allocation within 6 months and 100 percent within 3 years of receiving an award letter from MDE.
  • An allocation cap of $15 million for the district will be applied. The allocations will be distributed on a “first come, first serve” basis. If funds remain at MDE after 9 months of the announcement of available allocations, districts may request a waiver to exceed the $15 million district cap.
  • Additionally, it is mandatory that districts consult legal counsel to ensure their proposal complies with all federal and state laws, rules, guidelines, and regulations. This also includes working with bond counsel to verify that the proceeds of ARRA-QSCBs are used for purposes permitted under federal and state law.

The ARRA-QSCB is a loan that must be repaid within a specified time. The rate of the tax credit and the maximum term of the bond are determined by the United States Treasury Department. In most cases, the tax credit mechanism eliminates the cost of interest only, not the bond principal.

For more information about the federal ARRA-QSCB Program, visit: http://www.ed.gov/policy/gen/leg/recovery/modernization/index.html To obtain an application for a ARRA-QSCB allocation, visit the Michigan Department of Education's website at www.michigan.gov/mde (left hand side of screen select Grants button, then select Other Federal and Private Grant Sources) under Qualified School Construction Bond, or contact Andy DeYoung in Grants Coordination and School Support at (517) 373-4583.


June 16, 2009

Subject: MDE Official Communication - #077-09 - FAQs on ARRA

Now available on the Michigan Department of Education website are Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) documents on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).  There are separate FAQs on the following:

There also is a document assisting school officials on where to access additional information on implementing ARRA funds.

Link to: www.michigan.gov/mde-recovery

 
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